The People's eBook Hopes to Revolutionize Digital Book Design

The People's eBook

An upcoming online tool, The People's eBook, aims to simplify the process of designing and publishing digital books, for no cost to the self-publisher. Site creator Greg Albers of Hol Art Books started a Kickstarter campaign to fund the project a little over a week ago, and already he's met the $10,000 goal.

Inspired by zines and alternative presses, Albers conceived The People's eBook as the DIY answer to the popular book-building services out there.

The People's E-Book seeks to be a lab, an incubator, an e-book creation platform for artists, authors, and alternative presses who want to try new things, publish new books, and push into new territories. The People's E-Book will handle e-books of all sizes and scope, but it will excel in areas that no one else has cared to consider—the very small, the quick and dirty, the simple and the experimental.

From the photos on the Kickstarter page, the interface looks pretty slick. It utilizes HTML5 and drag-and-drop controls, allowing the user to see every page of the eBook as it's built. It supports advanced coding and hacking as well, expanding the design possibilities further. "The People's E-Book is a tool that doesn't account for what e-books are," says Albers, "but rather lets its users imagine what they can be."

Though the Kickstarter is thoroughly backed at this point, every little bit helps, and there's still goodies to be had. If you're interested, just click here to contribute.

Who here is excited about this project? Any horror stories (or at least semi-ghoulish tales) tied to your eBook building experiences you'd like to share?

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Comments

Bill Glover's picture
Bill Glover from Northern California (currently) is reading Lamb by Christopher Moore February 9, 2013 - 4:14pm

This looks interesting. I've been writing software for a couple of decades and I still get frustrated wrestling with the idiosyncracies of different e-book platforms. And places like Smashwords are still at the mercy of the Microsft Word roullette wheel.

I used to love putting together zines with friends, and it would be cool to have a nice, web-hosted interface that turned out clean, e-book files fast enough and well enough to allow for on-off experiments and quick collaborations.

This might be a fun way to do a serial, or a backstory for an Alternate Reality Game.