Richard Thomas

Storyville: Ending 2019 with a Bang

In: Research
Some tips for how to end 2019 and set up 2020 for writing success.
Andrea J. Johnson

Craft A Cozy Mystery In Three Killer Steps

Crafting a mystery series can be fraught with peril, but tackle these three questions and you’re guaranteed to unlock what lies at the heart of the terror.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Using Your Family to Tell Dark Stories

Some tips on using the people around you to provide depth, meaning, emotion, and authority in your stories.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Using Rituals to Make Your Stories More Believable

In: Research
Some tips on how to use ritual, ceremony, and witchcraft to make your story more believable.
Fred Venturini

All Hail the Slasher: The Rise and Legacy of an Iconic Subgenre of Horror

In: POV
Freddy. Michael. Jason. How did slasher films dominate the horror genre in the 70's and 80's? Let's examine the rise of the subgenre and it's legacy as pure cinematic experience.
Jessica Marie Baumgartner

Dyslexic Author is my Favorite Oxymoron

In: Word Play
Why would anyone with dyslexia try to be a writer? Ask Anne Rice, Richard Ford, or sit down and let me tell you my story.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Finding Original Locations to Set Your Horror Stories

In: Setting
How can you find original locations to set your horror stories? Here are a few ideas.
Andrea J. Johnson

Tackling the Issue of Consent in Fiction

In: Character
This article offers authors strategies for exploring the darker side of sex with safety and consent in mind.
Gabino Iglesias

8 Writing and Researching Tools You Might be Ignoring

In: Research
When it comes to writing and research, some really useful tools are hiding in plain sight. Here's a list of my favorites.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Pacing and Depth in Short Fiction vs. Novels

In: Setting
Thoughts on the differences between novels and short stories, specifically when it comes to pacing and depth.
Gabino Iglesias

What Reviewing Nonfiction Taught Me About Writing Fiction

Reviewing nonfiction taught me a few tricks that helped improve my approach to writing fiction.

Tweak Those Boring, Stereotypical White Dude Characters

In: Character
I hate to say it in this context, but you can do better.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Letting Film Unblock, Inspire, and Add Depth to Your Fiction

In: Research
Tips on how film can help unblock, inspire, and add depth to your fiction.
emmanuelnataf

How to Approach the Second Draft of Your Novel-in-Making

In: Rewriting
As C.J. Cherryh wrote, “It is perfectly okay to write garbage — as long as you edit brilliantly.” Here are five tips on how to approach the second draft of your novel-in-making.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: How Travel Can Inform Your Writing

In: Research
Tips on how travel can inform your fiction.
Andrea J. Johnson

13 Reasons Why Your Novel Sucks At Diversity

In: Character
A list of thirteen egregious offenses committed while creating diverse stories, coupled with solutions writers can adopt to approach race or any other minority status with sensitivity and respect.
emmanuelnataf

Revisiting Old Works-in-Progress: 5 Ways to Make the Most Out of It

In: Rewriting
Just because a story is old doesn’t automatically mean that it’s terrible. Here are five tips on how to make the most of an ancient manuscript that you might have once forgotten in a drawer somewhere.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Living Vicariously Through Our Fiction

Some thoughts on how and why we live through our stories and protagonists.
Autumn Christian

5 Lessons Fiction Writers Can Learn From Video Games

If you're a writer who likes games and needed an excuse to play more, here it is.
Autumn Christian

How to Write Edgy Fiction Without Being Obnoxious

In: Abstracts
Edgy fiction is difficult to pull off - and requires a depth and understanding of history, literature, and yourself. It's not about repeating what's been done before. It's about expanding it.
Repo Kempt

10 Things Every Horror Writer Should Read

In: Research
Given the limited amount of reading time in our lives, it's important not to waste time consuming material that won't help us progress and develop.
Gabino Iglesias

10 Tips for a Superb Reading

Reading your work in public matters. A lot. Here's how to do it right.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Sympathy for the Devil

In: Character, POV
In order for your bad guys to truly resonate, we need to care about them, and feel strong emotions. Even if that emotion is hate.
Repo Kempt

Writing Horror Using All Five Senses

In: Word Play
How to effectively use sensory details to connect with readers and maximize the fear in your writing.