WSJ: eReaders Let Trampy Tramps Read All The Dirty Lit They Want (Which Is A Lot)

WSJ: eReaders Let Tramps Read Dirty Lit

Via the Wall Street Journal:

Remember that Mad Men episode when all of the women in the office are swapping a steamy paperback in secret, and they tell Peggy to make sure she doesn't read it on the bus, because it will attract the wrong element? If Peggy had had an eReader, she would have been able to get her saucytime on in peace, even on the train. And, according to the Wall Street Journal, she wouldn't be alone--because, scandal of all scandals, women love dirty lit--and they're reading even more of it, now that they can keep it on the downlow. 

What the WSJ article is actually about is how many more women are reading "romantica" on their Nooks, Kindles, and iPads, because they don't have to worry about, you know, looking like sexual beings who enjoy literature which reflects their nature. Privacy has created a distinctive uptick in the popularity of books like Fifty Shades Of Grey, as well as eBook-only erotica, which is a crazypants world.

But the underpinnings of the piece are actually the standard-issue shock and awe about the fact that women are titillated by the written word. Which is not new (paging Anais Nin). We ladies just have a more practical solution than wrapping our books in brown paper sacks. Thanks, eReaders!

Of course, "romantica" and erotica authors have, perhaps to their credit, never downplayed the content of their books when it comes to cover creation--picture the rows of shirtless Fabios on the magazine rack at the grocery store--but there is a distinctive measure of privacy that comes with digital writing. And, to be fair, a healthy part of the insecurity that comes with reading bodice-rippers on the bus isn't because of their sexy, sexy content--it's the fact that they aren't, you know, Moonwalking with Einstein. Or something even smarter.

What's next...men reading chick lit? Stop the presses. 

Image: Dave Dugdale

Image of Fifty Shades of Grey
Author: E L James
Price:
Publisher: The Writer's Coffee Shop (2011)
Binding: Paperback, 372 pages
Hanna Brooks Olsen

News by Hanna Brooks Olsen

Hanna Brooks Olsen is a freelance writer who lives in Seattle. She's a regular contributor to Seattle Pulp, where she also hosts a podcast, and an associate editor at Blisstree. Follow her on Twitter to see the kind of non-sequiturs that 20-somethings enjoy, as well as the occasional live-blogging of various political events. You may visit her online at hannabrooksolsen.com.

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