Leah Dearborn

How Precocious is Too Precocious? Writing Smart but Believable Kids

In: Character
There’s a fine line that authors tread when writing from a child's perspective. A balance must be found between a voice that is unrealistically adult, and one that is too naive to be engaging.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Fiction As Film—Writing Scenes That Are Visual

How can your fiction be as visual and engrossing as a film? Here are some suggestions.
Taylor Houston

Ask the Grammarian: Multiple Hopes, Lay vs. Lie, Basically Useless Vocabulary, and a Stumper

In: Grammar
In this episode, we will attack the grammatical conundrums in the following sentence: Basically, our hopes have lay with the children.
Nathan Scalia

It's Made Of SCIENCE: Multiple Personalities

What you need to know about the dissociative identity disorder, multiple personalities, and SCIENCE.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: 10 Ways to Evaluate Your Writing Career

In: Research
How do you know if your writing career is going well? Here are 10 ways to check your progress.
Robbie Blair

Thickening Skin: 6 Tips for Taking Criticism

In: Workshop
Tips for how to take criticism—including both constructive feedback and more volatile attacks on your work.
Taylor Houston

Nothing New Under The Sun: The Origins of 5 Common Literary Allusions Part 2

In: Grammar
Monkeys and horses and goats—Oh My! Five more common allusions explained.
Joshua Mohr

Joshua Mohr and Anisse Gross Talk Plot

In: Plot
LitReactor instructor and 'Fight Song' author Joshua Mohr talks writing plots with The Rumpus film editor Anisse Gross. You should probably listen.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Manipulating Your Readers

How do you manipulate your audience? Here are a few tips.
Taylor Houston

Ask the Grammarian: 'Too' Many Commas, Sentence Fragments, and Rhetoric

In: Grammar
Where to put (or not put) commas with the word 'too', my opinion on sentence fragments, and a dicussion of rhetoric that could get me in trouble.
Nathan Scalia

It's Made Of SCIENCE: The Speed Of Light

What you need to know about the speed of light, faster-than-light travel, and SCIENCE.
Troy Farah

Dystropia: All Hail The Magnificent Bastard

In: Cliche
In this episode of Dystropia, we look at the Magnificent Bastard, who is cunning, charming and crafty. What makes him tick and why are we all of a sudden so attracted to him?
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Ten Tips for Successfully Publishing Your Stories

In: Research
Here are ten tips for successfully publishing your stories.
Taylor Houston

Ask The Grammarian With Taylor Houston—Now Taking Your Questions

In: Grammar
Got a burning question about grammar or usage? Ask Taylor Houston, LitReactor's grammar columnuist, for help.
Jessica Meddows

Five Legal Issues All Writers Need To Be Aware Of

In: Research
Have you wondered whether your work is protected by copyright? Or whether you can write a story based on people you know? This article delves into five legal issues frequently encountered by writers.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: What is Literary Fiction?

In: Research
How do you define literary fiction?
Taylor Houston

Is it the Fourth or the 4th of July?: Formatting Numbers in Your Writing

In: Grammar
You may not know it, but there are many rules that govern when you should spell out a number and when you should use the numerals. Here are a few of them.
Kimberly Turner

Write Like a Girl (or Guy)

Let's talk about sex, baby... How do you write characters of the opposite sex who don't sound like a man doing a poor imitation of a woman, or vice versa? What are the real differences in how we talk?
Nathan Scalia

It's Made Of SCIENCE: Writing Characters That Are Smarter Than You

You might consider yourself intelligent, perhaps even enlightened, but nobody can know everything. How can you write characters that know more than you do?
Richard Thomas

Storyville: 15 Unconventional Story Methods

Here are 15 unconventional methods of telling a story. Why not stretch yourself?
Troy Farah

Dystropia: Examining the Trope of the Manic Pixie Dream Girl

In: Cliche
A column in which we explore the various misgivings and strengths of girls that are Manic, Pixie and Dreamy.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Dramatic Structure and Freytag's Triangle

In: Structure
Is your dramatic structure intact? Study Freytag's Triangle to see if it is.
Robbie Blair

7 Things Dungeons & Dragons Taught Me About Storytelling

In: Plot
A nerdy confessional where I go back through some tabletop RPG experiences that taught me valuable storytelling truths.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: What is Neo-Noir Fiction?

In: Voice
Neo-noir fiction is literally defined as "new-black," but what exactly does that mean?
Richard Thomas

Storyville: How Do You Know When Your Story is Done?

In: Research
It's hard to tell when a story is done. Here are some tips for figuring it out.