8 Ways to Support the Writers in Your Life

Beyond my personal experiences as a writer, I've also been close friends with more writers than I can count. (That may just be because I'm bad at math, though.) I have relatives who write, I have friends who write, I've dated people who write ... I've seen the relationship from many different angles and figured out a few of the best ways to support the writers I'm close to. While it's important to remember that there's no "one size fits all" option, these eight tips provide a solid starting point for supporting the writers in your life.

1. Learn about and respect their writing process.

I could give a great many details about how to support me as a writer, but most of you have never met me before so that will only do so much good. I've worked with enough writers to know that, while we're similar in many ways, we are not a homogenous group. Writing is not a predictable process, and each writer develops their own approach to it over time. Rather than assuming that your writer functions in specific ways, talk to them about their unique process so you can understand it a bit better.

My remaining tips won't reveal any super-secret desires that your writer is trying to hide—so if your writer contradicts any of the items on the rest of this list, just ignore that particular bit of my advice. 

2. Don't lie.

If you want to express interest in something your writer is crafting, then that's fantastic—so long as you're actually interested. Sure, some writers will feel put off if you don't love their work as much as you love them, but you'll be doing them a disservice if you pretend to like something that bores you to tears.

Authentic interest is something we crave—but don't offer interest if it isn't real. If you want to become interested but aren't yet, try asking gentle, open questions about the story. Note that some writers will not enjoy this at all while others will enjoy both the attention and the opportunity to further formulate their ideas. If they're comfortable talking about their work, guide the conversation toward the elements of the story that actually appeal to you.

3. Provide edible/quaffable support.

Many writers appreciate a good snack while they're working. Sadly, many of us also have terrible snacking habits. I myself tend to make peanut butter chocolate chip sandwiches when I'm facing a deadline. If you can provide tasty yet moderately healthy snacks (like fruits, for example), you'll be helping out in more ways than one. 

Also, just like cars need gas and Santa needs to spy on little children while they're sleeping, most of us writers require caffeine to operate. (There's actually some interesting neurological stuff going on that explains this writerly addiction.) If you keep the kettle on or make sure there's always coffee available, we'll love you for it.

4. Get them to write, right now.

Not talk about their writing. Not brainstorm. Not organize. Not research. Not read articles on LitReactor.

Write.

Just write.

Writers face what I refer to as an "inertial barrier." It's difficult for us to get started with writing, but once we've gotten there it gets progressively easier and more enjoyable. We tend to be quite practiced at procrastination techniques, especially the ones that make it seem like we're working on our story, but this only serves to increase the inertia. If you give us an extra push toward simply writing, you'll be helping us get the momentum and energy required to get past the inertial barrier.

5. Give them a territory.

If you're living with this writer, one of the best things you can do is give them a specific territory that they can organize or destroy as they see fit.

For example, I need absolute organization to work effectively, but I don't need a lot of extras. I can set up an organized writing desk anywhere in the world. But others need a bit of clutter. Others still need a sense that they've emotionally charged the space. Some work best in outright chaos. Now, there are limits to how much a chaotic workspace can be functional; my father is a wonderful man, but his office is a fire hazard. Still, up until it's absolutely unbearable, let the writer make the space their own. Our environments play a significant role for our emotional states, and if your writer feels uneasy they aren't likely to write.

6. Encourage them to take care of themselves.

Writers have high-stress work, little natural social time, and (generally) sedentary lifestyles. We often fail to take care of ourselves and, as a result, crack under the stress. Rather than pressuring us to make our deadlines (I promise, we feel enough pressure already), you'll be doing us a big favor by encouraging us to do basic emotional maintenance.

Emotional maintenance is another one of those things that comes in different forms for different people. For me, it's yoga, meditation, and long walks. For others it's ping pong, socializing with close friends, and eating a balanced breakfast. Whatever helps bolster your writer's emotional resources will help them stand strong against their various challenges.

7. Do more than pat them on the head.

My guess is you're reading this because you want to help a writer in your life, not because you're a writer yourself. (Though maybe you are, in which case you'll have an advantage on this one.) Even if you don't feel you have much to say about writing itself, you'll run into problems if all you do is congratulate your writer on a job well done over and over again.

Your writer will start to lose respect for your opinion. They'll realize that you're not going to give any in-depth feedback, and that makes you kind of useless. So giving support is great, praise is great, and it's fine if you like everything that your writer produces—but you'll need to be specific with the things that you especially liked, items that may not have worked as well for you, and so on.

By all means, however, check in with your writer before you start giving critical analysis; sometimes we're just looking to see if the content is functional and enjoyable on a basic level, and other times we really do want that pat on the head.

8. Leave them the fuck alone!

It's rare to get into the flow state for writing—and it's incredibly valuable. I've produced 40+ pages in a sitting because I got into the flow of it. Don't disrupt your writer, don't ask questions. In fact, as much as you can, try to disappear. And if your writer is in the zone but you had plans? It's his or her turn to take the dog for a walk? You know they have to wake up early and it's currently 3 a.m.?

Just leave them the fuck alone. One of the most supportive things you can do is treat that flow state as sacred. I know it's a pain to change your plans while they stare at a screen and type, but don't worry ... this doesn't happen very often.

Oh, and here's a bonus tip that has little to do with their writing and everything to do with your own: Don't make stupid spelling or grammar mistakes. Even if your writer is nice about it, odds are they're judging you for typing "their is alot of things on my mind."

And that's it for today. How about you? What's worked in supporting the writers in your life? If you're a writer, what support can others offer that would be most beneficial to you? Let us know in the comments, below.

Robbie Blair

Column by Robbie Blair

Robbie Blair is a world-wandering author and poet who blogs about his adventures, the writing craft, and more. He was doomed to write when, at just three years old, his English-professor father taught him the "To be or not to be" soliloquy. Robbie has since published more than a dozen creative pieces in literary journals (including Touchstones, Enormous Rooms, Warp + Weave, and V Magazine). Robbie Blair's website is loaded with travel narratives; original creative work;  writerly humor; pretty pictures; writing games, lessons, tips, and exercises; and other uber-nifty™ content.

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Comments

bohemianonrye's picture
bohemianonrye from Pittsburgh, PA is reading Love in the Time of Global Warming October 2, 2013 - 6:32pm

Sending this to my husband right...now...

Amanda Sledge's picture
Amanda Sledge October 24, 2013 - 1:48pm

Over the next month, I am preparing to quit my day job and start writing a book. My boyfriend, whom I am set to move in with soon, is a songwriter. These tips are great for knowledge for the both of us!

Sanbai's picture
Sanbai from the Midwest is reading The War of Art January 11, 2014 - 6:38pm

Robbie, you are cute and this is awesome.

 

danielstokes's picture
danielstokes January 5, 2016 - 1:23am

Building a career means we have to put all our dedication and determination in edge. Otherwise we are unable to get quick and effective career success in life; therefore it is quite better to refine our skills and strategies and in most of the occasion we have found that people are unable to proceed with their old traditional methods of success. Therefore they used to take reference from experts and experienced persons and from here we learn how to support the writers to implement things in your life.