Trent Reznor Releases Free Teaser Of 'The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo' Soundtrack

Trent Reznor offers sneak peak at 'The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo' soundtrack

via Slash Film

Want to hear a sneak peak of the soundtrack to David Fincher's The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo?

Then Trent Reznor wants to hook you up. 

Reznor, who scored the film with Atticus Ross (they were the team behind Fincher's The Social Network, for which they won an Oscar) has posted a sampler containing six songs--a mere fraction of the three-hour final album. Click here to download

Sayeth Reznor: 

“For the last fourteen months Atticus and I have been hard at work … We laughed, we cried, we lost our minds and in the process made some of the most beautiful and disturbing music of our careers. The result is a sprawling three-hour opus that I am happy to announce is available for pre-order right now for as low as $11.99. The full release will be available in one week – December 9th.”

Fincher's movie is based on the first book in Stieg Larsson‘s best-selling trilogy about a girl with tattoos who plays with fire and kicks a hornets nest, or something. I'm still waiting for someone I trust to tell me the books are good, which is why I haven't picked one up yet. 

But the movie looks pretty great. (You can stream the extended 8 minute trailer over at iTunes.) David Fincher can't do much wrong and I have a soft spot in my heart for Daniel Craig. He's so rugged and British. Also, the movie comes out on my birthday (Dec. 21) and for some reason that makes me feel special. 

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Kirk's picture
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Kirk from Pingree Grove, IL is reading The Book Of The New Sun December 2, 2011 - 10:59am

The music is awesome, particularly the 4th track. I'm very excited to hear that when the full release is out, it's 3 hours of music. Totally cool.

wickedvoodoo's picture
wickedvoodoo from Mansfield, England is reading stuff. December 2, 2011 - 11:01am

I'm looking forward to this soundtrack a lot more than I am the movie. Some of Trent's work is awesome.

I read the first Millenium book a couple months back and it wasn't all that. A middle of the road thriller. Not a bad book but nothing special.

Joshua Chaplinsky's picture
Joshua Chaplinsky from New York is reading a lot more during the quarantine December 2, 2011 - 11:11am

@wickedvoodoo

Yes, but FINCHER! He's gone on record as saying they changed the ending from the book because it sucked, so I have high hopes.

wickedvoodoo's picture
wickedvoodoo from Mansfield, England is reading stuff. December 2, 2011 - 11:28am

Yeah he's done a couple of good ones. I'm not a big movie guy though. I have a hard time getting excited about new movies compared to say a new book or album or whatever.

I'll still probably check it out at some point. Just not at the cinema. *grumble grumble whinge about the price of cinema tickets nowadays*

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Rob from New York City is reading at a fast enough pace it would be cumbersome to update this December 2, 2011 - 11:42am

I don't so much mind the cost of seeing a movie in theaters, it's just that whenever I go WITHOUT FAIL there are people around me talking, texting and generally being obnoxious. 

And when I ask them to stop, they treat me like I'm the asshole in that scenario. 

I swore off movies for nearly a year, and only now and just getting back into it. I yearn for an Alamo Drafthouse in New York City, where they strictly enforce a no-talking policy and kick out patrons who break it...

Kirk's picture
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Kirk from Pingree Grove, IL is reading The Book Of The New Sun December 2, 2011 - 1:43pm

Yeah he's done a couple of good ones

Fincher's hasn't done "a couple of good ones". Everything he's done is good, even the stuff that I'm not the biggest fan of. Until he makes a bomb, I'll see everything he makes without question.

wickedvoodoo's picture
wickedvoodoo from Mansfield, England is reading stuff. December 2, 2011 - 2:51pm

@ Kirk

See this is what I mean. I could never get that hyped about movies or any one director. Movies have let me down a few times too many.

My friends are constantly giving me shit about it too, Just not the medium of art for me I guess.

 

 

Joshua Chaplinsky's picture
Joshua Chaplinsky from New York is reading a lot more during the quarantine December 2, 2011 - 3:23pm

Just watched the 8 minute trailer. I can't get enough. The only Fincher movie I'd say I don't really like is Benjamin Button, but it's still a technical marvel. I think he is one of the most skilled directors working today. He's the closest thing we have to Kubrick.

And no one outside of NYC has the right to complain about ticket prices, cause we gots the highest. You'd think this being such a cosmopolitan city, we'd also have the most respectful audiences, but no. Like Rob said, we've got our share of jerks.

And Kirk, that 4th track is great.

postpomo's picture
postpomo from Canada is reading words words words December 2, 2011 - 4:55pm

Reznor & Fincher are both big on sound (I think Fincher redid all the sound for the DVD release of Se7en) so this is an interesting project.

@Rob W Hart - I read the trilogy last year sometime, and I can't for the life of me figure out why it was such a hit - right place, right time? If you are curious, read the first book. If it didn't make you question your motives, read the second one. Stay well away from the third.

also, do Swedish people really drink that much coffee?

ps I'd like to see Fincher re-do Alien 3 without all the production problems.

Kirk's picture
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Kirk from Pingree Grove, IL is reading The Book Of The New Sun December 2, 2011 - 5:27pm

Based on the experince I've had with Swedish family-friends when they were visiting, they drink a lot of coffee and it is very, very strong. But they don't drink it out of giant mugs ilke we do.

Chester Pane's picture
Chester Pane from Portland, Oregon is reading The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz December 3, 2011 - 11:06am

This is great. Thanks Rob. 

aliensoul77's picture
aliensoul77 from a cold distant star is reading the writing on the wall. December 4, 2011 - 7:11am

The books were really hard to read especially the first one but a movie can turn a terrible book into a visual delight.  I just don't get why he had to write 80 pages about banking before getting into the story.

Mick Cory's picture
Mick Cory from Kentucky is reading everything you have ever posted online and is frankly shocked you have survived this long December 6, 2011 - 9:22am

   Am I alone in feeling more than a bit outraged by this trend of remaking absolutely solid films for the sole purpose of coddling American audiences? How can this be?

   Is it really so difficult to read subtitles? Or is it something more sinister at play? Have we as a country become so willfully insulated that we ignore opportunities to engage fine examples of modern storytelling just because they are foreign? I see this as yet another moment lost when we could have shared in the artistic exports of our fellow citizens of the world. Fucking boo.

   I sincerely doubt that anyone involved in this particular production, save perhaps Reznor and Ross, truly believe they are party to the making of a better product. It just seems so absurd to me. The Fincher worship is equally daft (Alien 3, The Game, Zodiac). This is just the most recent in a continuing flood of films with similar origins. The senseless (and inferior) remake of Alfredson's "Let The Right One In" springs to mind.

   Straying slightly I would like to point out they (read studios, writers and directors with no original ideas) have again remade a Peckinpah film. Fucking Peckinpah! Where will this end? Will it end? How soon after Nolan's end to his stellar and arguably game changing adaption of comic book material is released will there be a reboot of that franchise. Wait, there is a massive clue right there. Franchise. Step on the quality and expand your customer base. Oh what happy addicts we are.

Joshua Chaplinsky's picture
Joshua Chaplinsky from New York is reading a lot more during the quarantine December 6, 2011 - 9:58am

I think you're way off on this. I've said it before and I'll say it again- aside from Rapace's performance, the original film is not that good. It has a lot of the same flaws the book had, the biggest of which is the ending.

Hollywood pointlessly remakes a lot of foreign films. This is true. I love the original Let The Right One In and hated the American remake. And I'm sure the Dragon Tattoo remake was spawned out of a similar corporate greed. But because of the involvement of Fincher, and how I felt about the original adaptation, and due to the fact that they've completely changed the ending, I feel this remake is warranted.

And if you're not a fan of Fincher worship, fine. I get it. But there is no denying that the man is a technical master and a seriously talented filmmaker. You yourself only describe the original as "solid" and "fine," so you couldn't have been too impressed. The new trailer alone blows away the original film. It's not some holy relic that the remake should demand such outrage. You should save that for when they remake The Seventh Seal or 8 1/2.

Mick Cory's picture
Mick Cory from Kentucky is reading everything you have ever posted online and is frankly shocked you have survived this long December 6, 2011 - 10:24am

   You are correct. I do not feel the original film is a cinematic masterpiece. At the same time I suggest there are absolute differences in how we engage material as oppossed to say a Swedish audience. We have a tendency to expect more of a show, almost without exception. The trailer for the GWTDT remake is a perfect example.

    Continuing with this point, take for instance the film version of Tinker, Tailor, Soilder, Spy. Already a massive hit in England and presumably enjoying a similar response throughout Europe, the assumption is it will fail to receive the same enthusiastic reaction from American audiences. Why? I feel we love a ripping yarn as much as the next audience. Do we really all suffer from ADD or is the water tainted with Ritalin? My outrage, while set adrift on the back of this one example, is in reality directed at the trend itself, at how this reflects on our culture. Are our standards really that low? There are five Die Hard films for a reason.

   I appreciate your response and the discussion.

Joshua Chaplinsky's picture
Joshua Chaplinsky from New York is reading a lot more during the quarantine December 6, 2011 - 10:45am

I actually went to a screening of Tinker Tailor last night. Again, I was a huge LTROI fan, so I was really looking forward to it. The film looks amazing and the actors are great, especially Oldman. It was convoluted and methodical with lots of talking and minimal action. So yeah, might be a tough sell on American audiences.

But I loved the pace. In fact, I felt the film could have been even longer, as some things/characters felt underdeveloped. When you find out who the spy is, it is almost beside the point, and feels almost arbitrary. I know there is a British mini-series version that is supposed to be pretty good. Think I'm gonna check that out.

So Tinker Tailor is technically a remake. See, they ain't all bad.

Mick Cory's picture
Mick Cory from Kentucky is reading everything you have ever posted online and is frankly shocked you have survived this long December 6, 2011 - 11:12am

   Technically yes, it is a remake though the transition from small screen to large is quite a different animal and rarely successful (the mini-series has Alec Guiness in the role of Smiley. I myself am looking for it currently).

   I can certainly understand (especially from the capitalist perception) the appeal of remaking existing material. The technical capabilities that exist now alone seem to urge these desires along. In some cases the flaws the original carry bind with elements of our indivdual lives and experiences to create something unique. I know this is a factor in my view. Yet just because something can be done does not mean it should.

   Of course, we could continue to debate this. I, as I am sure you do, understand the subjective nature of all that huddles under the banner of art. If I skin back the emotion involved what is revealed is what you agreed to in your first repy. There is a glut of pointless remakes. What else can I say, it just drives me fucking crazy.