Scary Stories To Watch In The Dark: Book Series Being Adapted

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

The creative team has changed, but good news, it looks like Scary Stories To Tell In The Dark will still be a movie.

Originally, the script was being penned by Patrick Melton and Marcus Dunstan, writers of Saw IV, V, and VI. The pair planned to take the stories and adapt them through a storytelling device that involved "a group of outcast kids who stand up to their fears to save their town when nightmares come to life." Whether or not the kids traveled in a van with an oversized dog is unclear.

However, the job has passed to screenplay writer John August, who is best known for Big Fish, Corpse Bride, and other Time Burton projects, and word on the street is that he's going back to the source material.

Let's hope. I would sure love to see "Wonderful Sausage" on the big screen. 

Anyone remember favorites you're...dying to see? Ugh, sorry for the pun.

 

Image of Scary Stories: More Tales to Chill Your Bones Edition: First
Author: Alvin Schwartz
Price: $10.92
Publisher: Scholastic Childrens (1991)
Binding: Paperback, pages
Image of Scary Stories to Tell In the Dark
Manufacturer: Scholastic Inc.
Part Number:
Price:

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Redd Tramp's picture
Redd Tramp from Los Angeles, CA is reading Mongrels by SGJ; Sacred and Immoral: On the Writings of Chuck Palahniuk; The History of Sexuality by Michel Foucault November 19, 2014 - 8:52am

It's been soooo long since I read that book. I don't remember what is was called but I remember this one story where a scarecrow comes to life and skins one of the farmers to make another scarecrow with his skin.

Roger Kilbourne's picture
Roger Kilbourne from Massachusetts is reading The Word Exchange November 19, 2014 - 10:31am

The Stephen Gammell illustrations are definitely what I remember the most (probably because I was a formally-trained illustrator in another life...). The one with the spiders coming out of the crack in the little girl's face still haunts me.

Brian Ingham's picture
Brian Ingham from Stillwater Oklahoma is reading There is No Year by. Blake Butler November 19, 2014 - 9:36pm


The fact that they even re-released this series without the original illustrations still upsets me. Can you even still find the originals? I sure hope so. I think I lost my childhood copies….
 

Redd Tramp's picture
Redd Tramp from Los Angeles, CA is reading Mongrels by SGJ; Sacred and Immoral: On the Writings of Chuck Palahniuk; The History of Sexuality by Michel Foucault November 20, 2014 - 11:28am

I have no idea, I haven't seen a copy since my elementary school library. 

SammyB's picture
SammyB from Las Vegas is reading currently too many to list November 20, 2014 - 3:32pm

You probably have to buy them used. I purchased the hardcover "treasurey" version, which has the original illustrations. This was a few years ago (probably four or five), but I would imagine they are on eBay or Amazon's used book option.

I'm curious to see what they do with this, but my expectations are (sadly) low.

helpfulsnowman's picture
Community Manager
helpfulsnowman from Colorado is reading But What If We're Wrong? by Chuck Klosterman November 20, 2014 - 10:02pm

They're definitely used on Amazon. Lots of nice copies, it looks like, and no ridiculous price. No offense to the new illustrator, but...why would you ever change those original illustrations?