June's Slate of Writing Workshops: YA, NA, Critique, Character, and Using Fact to Support Fiction

June's Slate of Writing Workshops: YA, NA, Critique, Character, and Using F

We've got a packed slate of workshops on tap for June—a little something for everyone, to help kick your writing goals into gear. 

Our class on writing horror fiction with substance, The Horror, The Horror III, taught by Dale Bailey, Nathan Ballingrud, Gemma Files, and Helen Marshall, kicks off June 2, and is one seat away from selling out. It might even be sold out already. If it is, don't worry. We've got plenty more. 

Supporting fiction with fact

On June 5 we're launching a brand-new class. It's one that I like a lot. Ben H. Winters, author of the excellent Last Policeman books, and recipient of multiple awards (Edgar, Philip K. Dick), will be teaching Make It Real. The idea is simple: Great fiction is underpinned by fact. 

The question is: Where do you get your facts? Wikipedia is not the correct answer. 

Anyone can write about an asteroid hurtling towards earth; Ben interviewed asteroid expert Timothy Spahr, director of the Minor Planet Center at the Harvard–Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, to find out how the science of it would work. It lends an incredible amount of authority to his work.

And he can show you how to find and utilize resources—not just to get the answers to your questions, but to find answers to questions you didn't even know you had. This three-week class includes a mix of discussion, hands-on research, and writing. 

Finding your critical voice

Next up is Everyone's a Critic with Ed Sikov. Ed is a biographer, film critic, professor, and memoirist—and in this two-week workshop, he'll teach you to find your critical voice. Because the internet is overflowing with critical writing, and most of it is crap. There's an art to this kind of thing. 

Besides studying the craft of criticism, you'll also learn the business end. Ed will offer advice on how to break into critical writing, as well as where to send or post your work to get maximum exposure.

NA and YA

Then we've got the one-two punch of Rhonda Helms and Mandy Hubbard. Rhonda's class, Intro to New Adult, was hugely popular the first time we offered it. And Mandy's class, Writing and Selling the Young Adult Novel, has sold out every time we've offered it. They start on June 16 and 23, respectively. If you want in, you better get moving. 

Crafting better characters

Rounding out June is David Corbett with The Craft of Character. How to render real people on the page. David wrote the book on characters. Literally. It's called The Art of Character and it was published last year by Penguin. But this class isn't a rehash of the book—it's brand new lectures mixed with writing assignments from David. And it starts June 30. 


As always, our classes take place in our custom online workshop. You'll get detailed feedback on your work and take part in discussions in a judgement-free zone. It doesn’t matter if you’re a beginner or an experienced writer, our workshops are about working together to achieve your writing goals.

That's what we've got coming up. Question or suggestion? Head on down to the comments. 

To leave a comment Login with Facebook or create a free account.

Comments

L.W. Flouisa's picture
L.W. Flouisa from Tennessee is reading More Murakami May 20, 2014 - 4:39pm

I think my only question is the three hundred price tag. (University classes are higher of course.) When I'm employed again this issue is going to be moot I hope.

I'm actually have to rethink how I tell stories, as I don't have the resources for history textbooks and stuff. I might go back to fairy tales.

Rob's picture
Class Director
Rob from New York City is reading at a fast enough pace it would be cumbersome to update this May 20, 2014 - 5:12pm

We try very hard to strike a balance between pricing the classes fairly, and fairly compensating the people who work on these—the instructor, the website tech, the class facilitator.

I have looked around at other websites offering classes, and I've seen classes that are more expensive and offer less engagement. And some of these programs bring in MFA grads with slim CVs to teach. They might be gifted instructors, and I'm not knocking anyone, but that's someone else's model. Ours is to bring in accomplished authors—people who have been through the gauntlet and are exciting to work with. 

For the skill levels of the instructors, along with the amount of engagement, our pricing is more than fair. I'm sure there are people who will disagree. There have been people who have very vociferously disagree. But that's the thought process. 

It's also why I try to mix in shorter, more affordable classes, so not everything is at one price level. You may not always be able to take the class you want, but there are options.