Karina Wilson

10 Reasons Your Screenplay Sucks (and how to fix it)

What makes a reader hate a screenplay on sight? Here are 10 pet peeves - and fixes.
Jon Gingerich

Big ‘A’ Little ‘a’: Writing Between the Concrete and Abstract

One the most widely misunderstood — yet crucial — skills a writer must learn is the ability to put specific actions on the page that transcend into larger, universal concepts.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Story Dissection - Maker of Flight

Richard dissects another of his short stories, this time, the contest winning, "Maker of Flight."
Jon Gingerich

Getting Over It, Getting It Out: On Embracing A Bad First Draft

Let's face it: the first draft of anything is going to be awful. That's okay. In fact, here's why it's encouraged.
Kimberly Turner

The Secret Lives Of Little Words

What's that word doing there? When it comes to spoken language, nothing is accidental. Linguists are working on finding meaning in every 'oh,' 'um,' 'well,' and 'okay.' The results might surprise you.
Jon Gingerich

Overcoming “Voice Anxiety”

Writers stress themselves out over the idea of devising a unique, compelling voice in their writing. Here's why a lot of that anxiety is underserved.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Writing Horror Stories

What does it take to write a terrifying story? Every tool in your writer's toolbelt.
Jack Ketchum

Splat Goes the Hero: Visceral Horror

Jack Ketchum on violence, pain, and the importance of not looking away.
Stephen Graham Jones

Why Genre

How utilizing genre can enable you to write strong fiction.
Stephen Graham Jones

Ten Obvious Truths About Fiction

Ten obvious truths about fiction and its relationship with your readers.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Where Do You Get Your Ideas?

Where do you get your ideas? Turns out, you can get them just about anywhere. But the best stories tap into your personal experiences and emotional truths.
Jon Gingerich

Writing Effective Dialogue

Writing authentic, compelling and engaging dialogue is one of the most vital yet misunderstood challenges of the writing process.
Brandon Tietz

Merits of Other Mediums: Going Beyond Books to Improve Your Craft

Many authors will tell you that reading and writing is the key to improving your work and getting published. In this column we examine the merits of three mediums OTHER than books.
Chuck Palahniuk

Stocking Stuffers: 13 Writing Tips From Chuck Palahniuk

Christmas comes early today! In this essay Chuck provides a grab-bag of incredibly useful ideas that don't require too much individual elaboration. From delineating the three types of speech, to simple maxims for the writing life.
Jon Gingerich

When To Show, When To Tell

Maintaining action is paramount in fiction, but sooner or later we’ll need to deliver expository details for our stories to make sense. So, how do writers engage while providing character depth?
Jon Gingerich

Write Characters In A Representation-Free Zone

Many writers eschew compelling characters in favor of mannequin tropes that serve as props for preexisting social messages, or characters a reader can “relate to.” Here’s why it’s always bad writing.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Finding Your Voice

Embarking on the quest to find your very own literary voice
Jon Gingerich

Which P.O.V Is Right For Your Story?

A list of the different modes of point of view, with a breakdown of the advantages and disadvantages of each.
Chuck Palahniuk

Establishing Your Authority

In: Voice
Chuck teaches two principal methods for building a narrative voice your readers will believe in. Discover the Heart Method and the Head Method and how to employ each to greatest effect.
Chuck Palahniuk

Using “On-The-Body” Physical Sensation

In: Voice
Great writing must reach both the mind and the heart of your reader, but to effectively suspend reality in favor of the fictional world, you must communicate on a physical level, as well. Learn to unpack the details of physical sensation.
Chuck Palahniuk

Nuts and Bolts: “Big Voice” Versus “Little Voice”

In: Voice
An interesting character has strong opinions, and voicing them can lend mood and texture to the work, but you can't allow these "Big Voice" rants to eclipse the "Little Voice" needs for descriptive physical action. In this essay, you'll learn to strike that balance.
Chuck Palahniuk

Reading Out Loud – Part One

Lots of things that look smart on the page fall apart in the auditorium. Discover the numerous reasons Chuck writes for the ear as well as the eye, along with how to make the most of live reading opportunities.
Chuck Palahniuk

Reading Out Loud – Part Two

All humans are storytellers and every fiction is veiled autobiography. Learn to explore and exhaust your personal issues by creating something bigger than yourself, and don't miss Chuck's ingenious assignment for personalizing your character's perception of time.
Chuck Palahniuk

A Story from Scratch, Act Two

In: Voice
In the rough draft of Act Two, Chuck demonstrates how to reinforce physical details, along with "on-the-body" sensation, "Burnt Tongue," and other critical distinctions from previous lessons.