Richard Thomas

Storyville: 15 Unconventional Story Methods

Here are 15 unconventional methods of telling a story. Why not stretch yourself?
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Ten Ways to Avoid Cliches and Stereotypes

Ten tips to avoid clichés and stereotypes in your fiction.
Craig Clevenger Photo

The Safety of Transgression versus the Risk of Honesty

Being deliberately transgressive is the safest move a writer can make.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Happy, Not Sappy

It's not easy to write a happy story that is not melodramatic, but here are some tips on how to get there.
Jack Ketchum

Splat Goes the Hero: Visceral Horror

Jack Ketchum on violence, pain, and the importance of not looking away.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Where Do You Get Your Ideas?

Where do you get your ideas? Turns out, you can get them just about anywhere. But the best stories tap into your personal experiences and emotional truths.
Taylor Houston

Change the World: Write Your Manifesto

You are a writer— an artiste! A creator of beauty and meaning. A cultural commentator. A revolutionary! It's about damn time you wrote your manifesto!
Jon Gingerich

Write What You Don’t Know

Of all the rules that apply to fiction writing, perhaps none is more misleading than the common, banal adage that you should “write what you know.”
Jon Gingerich

The Changing Character

Does a character have to “change” during the course of a story? Do they have to evolve? Or can they continue behaving the same as always, even at the end of the narrative?
Taylor Houston

Sixth Sense Settings: Writing Rich, Descriptive Scenes

Incorporating tone/mood into your settings for realistic descriptions that keep your reader hooked.
Chuck Palahniuk

Developing a Theme

In: Theme
At the core of Minimalism is focusing any piece of writing to support one or two major themes. Learn harvesting, listing, and other methods, after a fun excursion into the spooky side of Chuck's childhood.
Chuck Palahniuk

Nuts and Bolts -- The Horizontal Versus the Vertical

Every story possesses the "horizontal" movement from plot point to plot point and finally to resolution, as well as the "vertical" development of character, theme, and emotional resonance. Discover Chuck's approach to building a story in layers.