JS Breukelaar

Five Ray Bradbury Stories That Tell Us Everything We Need to Know About Writing.

No writer stalked the inherent tensions in fiction with more guts and style than Ray Bradbury. Here are five lessons in conflict from the master of wonder.
Susan DeFreitas

What Every Successful Novel Opening Must Do: Myth vs. Reality

It's no secret that agents, editors, and their assistants are looking for any reason to reject a manuscript in the first few pages. But what does it really take to get readers hooked?
Richard Thomas

Storyville: 10 Ways to Fool Your Readers

Ten tips for the best ways to fool your readers.
Karina Wilson

Five Ways Scrivener Can Help Your Work In Progress

Why Scrivener? What can it do for your writing? Go beyond the "click here" tutorials and consider how this software can improve your work habits and the quality of your content.
Leah Dearborn

Trash or Treasure? A List of Five Obscure Literary Movements

From to Spiralism to Martian poetry, not every idea finds a solid foothold in history or a wide audience.
Max Booth III

Abandoning Linearity and Enabling Shuffle Mode: How to Write Out of Sequence

By writing out of sequence, you no longer have to force yourself to write the boring bits. You are always writing the fun chapters. The scenes that remind you why you’re a writer in the first place.
Karina Wilson

Screenwriting: The Emotional Spine

Got your three acts, your hero's journey and your turning points sorted? Good. But, what's holding them all together? Take your screenplay to the next level by addressing the emotional spine.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: How to Put Together an Anthology

Tips and information about how to put together an anthology of short stories.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Kill Your Darlings—How 'Game of Thrones' Can Change Your Writing

We can learn some valuable lessons about plotting, characters, and expectations from watching (or reading) 'Game of Thrones.'
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Three Essential Books On Writing

Three essential books on writing by Stephen King, Donald Maas and Jeff VanderMeer.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Dissecting "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?" by Joyce Carol Oates

One of the most talked about, published and taught stories, I dissect "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?" by Joyce Carol Oates.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: 15 Unconventional Story Methods

Here are 15 unconventional methods of telling a story. Why not stretch yourself?
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Dramatic Structure and Freytag's Triangle

Is your dramatic structure intact? Study Freytag's Triangle to see if it is.
Erik Wecks

The Best Writers Break the Rules

Young writers shouldn't be afraid to challenge the conventions of storytelling if they have a plot-driven reason for doing so.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Ten Ways to Avoid Cliches and Stereotypes

Ten tips to avoid clichés and stereotypes in your fiction.
Dana Fredsti

On Writer's Constipation, The Sophomore Slump and Zombies

Author Dana Fredsti talks about the trials and tribulations of writing the sequel to her hit book, 'Plague Town,' and all the anxiety and lessons that came with it.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Dissecting "Fireflies"

Dissecting my story, "Fireflies," I shine a light on my first attempt at magical realism — craft, process, and structure.
Robbie Blair

Flash Fiction: The Zorro Circle of Storytelling

Flash fiction can help writers answer vital questions: How can you identify which words to cut? How can you use subtlety to increase the power of your prose? And what's at the heart of a story?
Rob Hart

The Art of the Content Edit: 10 Ways To Make Sure You're Doing It Right

The proofreading phase is when a book gets pretty--but the content edit is when you really bring the story home. Here's how to do it right.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Narrative Hooks

Writing a great narrative hook isn't easy, but it's one way to grab your audience and never let them go.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: The Horror of Editing and Revision

It's been said that the difference between a good writer and a great writer is editing. So let's hop to it.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Endings, Twisted and Otherwise

A beginning, a middle, and an end. Let's talk about the end. Make it resonate.
Chris Rosales

Transition As Metaphor

Incorporate these principles to not only transition smoothly from scene to scene, but to add a new layer of metaphor for the manipulation of meaning and theme.
Chris Rosales

Is This Your Card? How Michael Chabon Uses Suspense in Literary Fiction

A study of how Michael Chabon uses Suspense in literary fiction to keep the reader reading and to move the story forward.
Richard Thomas

Storyville: Writing Horror Stories

What does it take to write a terrifying story? Every tool in your writer's toolbelt.