Nataliya Ashena's picture
Nataliya Ashena is reading University stuff January 30, 2012 - 6:06am

Hello everyone!

I would like to discuss with who are interested and who could help me about education's question.

How do you think is it possible to become a writer and be published without education in field of literature? I know it sounds a bit odd and funny, but anyway.

Of course, some examples exist - I mean people who became famouse without literature education, but I tend to think that there was a great talant!

Is it possible to get free education in US or UK? And if not, how much does it cost?

P.S. sorry for my mistakes =)

Many thanks in advance!

 

aliensoul77's picture
aliensoul77 from a cold distant star is reading the writing on the wall. January 30, 2012 - 12:47pm

What country are you in, Nataliya? I think you have to be a citizen of that country to get your education paid for but if you want to study in America or UK, a foreign exchange student program might be your best bet. I don't think it is required to have a background in literature to be a writer but just to be well read and to practice the craft. There are many famous writers who didn't finish college or have a formal education. You just have to write with passion and your whole heart.

Korey's picture
Korey January 30, 2012 - 9:21pm

Hi Nataliya,

Aliensoul is right, the best way to get a free education is to look into exchange programs and scholarships. I’m sure there are plenty out there for writers.I also agree with Aliensoul that you don’t have to get a degree in writing to make it. Kurt Vonnegut (an Anthropology major) actually suggested writers go to school for anything but writing. There’s more to his statement but it’s escaping me at the moment.

If you are set on studying writing there is no reason you can’t get the same or an even better education working with writing groups, workshops and bouncing ideas of other writers. Writing is a craft that’s honed over time. I get a better education in writing on this site than I have in any college classroom by far. But if this is what you’re passionate about then you need to study where your heart tells you is best—regardless of cost.

I briefly attended art school. I was studying illustration. When I was applying to school I was real hung up on the tuition. So much so I didn’t want to go. I emailed an old professor asking for advice. She said, “You can’t think of it as one lump sum. You have to think of it as a cup of coffee a day. Pick the school you really want to attend, get the education you want. It’s all about following your passion. Worry about the money later.” If you want to spend you life writing then I urge you to study it anywhere and in anyway you can.

Nataliya Ashena's picture
Nataliya Ashena is reading University stuff January 31, 2012 - 12:09am

Aliensou, thank you! 

I am from Russia, but I am studying in Austria now. As far as I know if you want to make an exchange you should study related subject, is that right? 

If it is, in my case it's impossible, coz I study Tourism.

Korey, thank you! 

aliensoul77's picture
aliensoul77 from a cold distant star is reading the writing on the wall. January 31, 2012 - 7:48am

Tourism is a major?  Well, you could do a tour of the world, that's sort of related? Again like Korey said you can learn writing anywhere, just read books of authors from all over the world. Writers who have lived through all life experiences, read biographies, fantasy, sci-fi, romance, anything you can get your hands on. They say write what you know so start there, write about your life, what it is like being a Russian in modern day Russia.  As an American, I'll be honest, I would know nothing about that. If someone asked me what young people in Russia do for fun, I would have no idea. You write for the reader and let them into your world and describe life how it really is. Like how black writers write about being black in America, latin Americans write about their culture and holding onto their values, and Asian culture of Americanized Asians versus traditionalists.  Do you feel young people in Russia have the freedom to express themselves if they are displeased with government in the same way other countries do? Or pick a time period in your country and describe how much has changed over time and write it from the perspective of an old person who has lived through it all. Talk to people, your grandparents, who have lived a long life.

Nataliya Ashena's picture
Nataliya Ashena is reading University stuff January 31, 2012 - 10:01am

Aliensoul, thanks a lot for your comment! You make me feel better, really!  

Jack Campbell Jr.'s picture
Jack Campbell Jr. from Lawrence, KS is reading American Rust by Phillipp Meyer July 10, 2012 - 6:28am

There are a lot of distance learning programs anymore for literature. Creative writing has a few, but there are many that you have to go for a few weeks every year called low-residency programs. I am in a Literary Arts (basicaly literature) curriculum at Fort Hays State University in Kansas. It is all online, and the total cost will be a little over seven thousand dollars.

Michael J. Riser's picture
Michael J. Riser from El Cerrito, CA (originally), now Fort Worth, TX is reading The San Veneficio Canon - Michael Cisco, The Croning - Laird Barron, By the Time We Leave Here, We'll Be Friends - J. David Osborne July 10, 2012 - 9:08am

Is that per year or semester, Jack? What do you think of it so far?

Jack Campbell Jr.'s picture
Jack Campbell Jr. from Lawrence, KS is reading American Rust by Phillipp Meyer July 10, 2012 - 11:15am

That is for the whole 31credit hour program, so basically two years.

I'm one class into it, so I can't really comment, but I like the online format of the class I am taking. I'm pretty self-motivating when it comes to reading and writing. It allows me to get it done when I have time to do it rather than take a class at a set time. The degree itself is a Master of Liberal Studies. These are the classes available, all online.

    Literature and the Environment
    Nineteenth Century Women Writers
    Literary Visions
    The British Novel
    The American Novel
    The European Novel
    Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century British Novel
    The Classics and You: Part I
    The Classics and You: Part II
    The Novella
    Ethnic American Literature
    Classics in Detective Fiction
    Film and Literature
    World Drama
    Modern American Poetry
    The Short Story

It seems pretty promising to me. I don't know that it would get you a job, but whereas I already have a career and am mostly want to study literature and make my writing better, I think it will be sufficient.

Michael J. Riser's picture
Michael J. Riser from El Cerrito, CA (originally), now Fort Worth, TX is reading The San Veneficio Canon - Michael Cisco, The Croning - Laird Barron, By the Time We Leave Here, We'll Be Friends - J. David Osborne July 10, 2012 - 2:47pm

Good deal. I'll have to follow up with you later on how that's been going for you.

GaryP's picture
GaryP from Denver is reading a bit of this and that July 10, 2012 - 3:09pm

Completely unrelated. I had to read 5 "great American novels" in a week for the final. Got a B. Thank the gods the final was all essay questions.

GaryP's picture
GaryP from Denver is reading a bit of this and that August 10, 2012 - 5:06am

Sheriff! We got us a Robbie.

GaryP's picture
GaryP from Denver is reading a bit of this and that August 10, 2012 - 8:44am

Now you can't just delete the robot posts, then it just makes me look like an idio--oh, wait, I see what you did there. Well played, sheriff. Well played.

avery of the dead's picture
avery of the dead from Kentucky is reading Cipher Sisters August 10, 2012 - 8:51am

To whom are you speaking???

GaryP's picture
GaryP from Denver is reading a bit of this and that August 10, 2012 - 2:18pm
[Hey, is she gone yet? Is it safe for me to come out?]