Cipherscribe's picture
Cipherscribe from Michigan, but all my exes live in Texas. is reading Dragonlance: Dragons of Autumn Twilight March 1, 2013 - 4:32pm

I pointed out a couple of typos on a story and submitted the doc back pointing them out. Is that bad etiquette since this is a contest? I was just trying to help out.

ArlaneEnalra's picture
ArlaneEnalra from Texas is reading Right now I'm editing . . .. March 1, 2013 - 5:14pm

@cipherscribe If you don't point it how, how are they supposed to find and correct it? I'd rather know about a mistake so I can fix it than not and let a bunch of readers stumble over it. I'd say finding/fixing issues in your work is a big part of what this site is about!

Adam Soandso's picture
Adam Soandso from the streets of rage is reading graffiti on the bathroom wall March 1, 2013 - 5:32pm

@NIck 

Can someone please explain how ratings can be accessed? I appear to have a couple but I can't see what they are or comments, etc. Thanks kindly.

If you take a look at your story's page, you'll see the bar there that lists your "approval rating" with more information if you hover the mouse over it for a moment. Not the most obvious or informative method, I'd prefer it actually say "5 out of 8 readers liked this" beneath the bar itself. As for the reviews, those will appear right above the comment box but it seems getting ratings is easier than reviews sometimes. 

Case in point, 5 minutes after I posted my story, I had a thumb's down. That was... bothersome, but okay.

Jonathan Riley's picture
Jonathan Riley from Memphis, Tennessee is reading Flashover by Gordon Highland March 1, 2013 - 5:42pm

@Adam

At the top left of your page next to the edit button there is a results button that will tell you how many ups and downs you have if you click on it. IT's just above the blue liner for the T.U. Background.

Cipherscribe's picture
Cipherscribe from Michigan, but all my exes live in Texas. is reading Dragonlance: Dragons of Autumn Twilight March 1, 2013 - 5:40pm

I got a thumbs down, too, but no bad critique. I get it's part of the process, but I'd like to know why the person didn't like it. I'm loving this site, btw.

Nick's picture
Nick from Toronto is reading Adjustment Day March 1, 2013 - 5:43pm

Thanks, Adam. Apparently I have seven ratings and zero comments.

I've read people asking others by name why they received a thumbs down. Not that I plan on doing that, but is there a way to find out who has rated your story?

Jonathan Riley's picture
Jonathan Riley from Memphis, Tennessee is reading Flashover by Gordon Highland March 1, 2013 - 5:46pm

@Nick

Not unless they comment and tell you. WHich i think people should make a habbit of. It is odd that you have seven ratings and no comments. At least the majority are all thumbs ups. I'll try to get to yours this weekend Nick and give you some feed back.

ender.che.13's picture
ender.che.13 from Northwestern U.S. living in the southeast peach. is reading Ken Follett March 1, 2013 - 6:06pm

If you read some of the previous threads, the no-comment rating issue has been gone into with some depth. We've all had problems with it, but I assure you guys that that is not the majority of LR community members. It's just a bummer. A minor bummer, but a bummer nonetheless.

SO! I want some feedback guys. I just read a great story, excellent, but I felt compelled to give it a thumbs down because it did not seem to me to meet the criteria of the contest at all. Of course, I expressed my reasoning in the comments, as to do otherwise would have been in extremely poor taste, and told them everything I loved about the story, but it still kind of bummed me out to thumb them down. What do you guys think? Justified? Evil bastid? Let me know.

Michael.Eric.Snyder's picture
Michael.Eric.Snyder March 1, 2013 - 6:12pm

Ender, positively evil. :)

You'll see in my comments why I disagree, BUT THAT'S OKAY.

It's the way the cookie crumbles. And as I stated in my reply to you, it's more important to me personally that you liked the story as much as you seemed to. 

One Tunguska Story

Adam Soandso's picture
Adam Soandso from the streets of rage is reading graffiti on the bathroom wall March 1, 2013 - 6:18pm

@Jonathan

Strange, I don't see that button at all. Perhaps it's a premium-members-only thing (I haven't yet decided to commit). 

 

@ender.che.13

I just started doing some reading and critiques and I came across a couple stories that I wasn't crazy about. I tried to decide how I would rate it on a 1-10 scale and also if it fit the criteria at all. I decided that it was a little bit in the middle but was out of place in the realm of this particular assignment, so I gave them an honest constructive review and decided to do a thumbs down. I didn't WANT to downvote but I really thought about it for a moment and I think I justified it enough in a comment so I wasn't just being an anonymous fly-by. I think that's what you need to consider. Writing and writers can be so decisive and most of them just really want fair honesty.

Personally, I don't mind getting downvoted as long as a sentence or two is thrown in along with it. I mean, I don't create high art and I don't have the highest opinion of my own work, but it feels like you're being brushed off more than honestly reviewed. But then I just tell myself "forget it, Adam. It's Internet Town" and move on with my life. Viva la thick skin!

Michael.Eric.Snyder's picture
Michael.Eric.Snyder March 1, 2013 - 6:28pm

BTW, I've semi-followed this thread, but haven't read it too closely, so I thought I'd chime in about the voting process. In a nutshell:

Thumbs down votes are hard.

So, I'm going to be candid here. The majority of stories I read I don't like, for one reason or another. They're poorly crafted, don't meet the requirements, or are full of grammatical errors. 

Some of these, though, I still like, for one reason or another. But to win a contest? Or at the very least to honestly critique, I can't justify thumbing up.

That leads me to the next problem: Justifying thumbs down. I'm a naturally untrustworthy person, so I worry that providing the appropriate critical feedback could result in... retaliation in the form of a thumbs down for my story. 

Ender is VERY LUCKY I thumbed him up ages ago. :)

Kidding!

At any rate, I'm for the voting results listing the voter as well, if only to drive accountability/honesty on the part of the voter, and to help maintain the integrity of the process.

One Tunguska Story

Cipherscribe's picture
Cipherscribe from Michigan, but all my exes live in Texas. is reading Dragonlance: Dragons of Autumn Twilight March 1, 2013 - 6:25pm

@ArlaneEnalra

That's also how I felt about it. Still, I've received one thumbs down and I can't help but think it came from that person. haha

Adam Soandso's picture
Adam Soandso from the streets of rage is reading graffiti on the bathroom wall March 1, 2013 - 6:34pm

@Michael

I think going into this thinking about it as if you're a judge for a mighty contest is a bad way to do it. I don't expect to win, nor did I enter with the intention of it. I liked the idea and the potential of sharing amongst a bunch of other scifi shorts cuz I effing love science fiction. So no matter what direction I vote, I don't have this higher criteria of "prize worthiness." Hell, we don't even know what prizes there are. Although, if it was a million bucks... maybe I'd be extra critical. But I think it's just healthier and more fun and generally nicer to the community (that I am admittedly very new in) to review/rate based on the story itself. Then again, I guess I'm just not as harsh a critic to the work of peers as I am to, say, films and books.

Bottom line, the purpose of the thumbs is really to give your own basic opinion. You like it? Thumbs up! Not so much? Thumbs down. That's it.

Michael.Eric.Snyder's picture
Michael.Eric.Snyder March 1, 2013 - 7:29pm

Adam, it's a 9 buck dip in the pool. 

You'll find widely ranging quality in the workshop submissions as well. But you'll also quickly determine whose reviews you respect and whose you might not agree with.

You'll learn from both.

Chuck's craft essays have helped me tremendously. There is a wealth of information delivered by credible, established authors. All for 9 bucks. 

Unless you're already publishing regularly, it's a no brainer. And there are plenty of members who DO publish regularly who are regular contributors as well.

Just my thoughts. Beware, though—the line by line critiques can be merciless. :)

One Tunguska Story

Michael.Eric.Snyder's picture
Michael.Eric.Snyder March 1, 2013 - 6:40pm

Hey Adam, I'm with you there. Completely. But there are others I'm sure who have a less healthy attitude. I mean shoot, and perhaps it's not a fair comparison, but the review culture at Amazon is one hot mess. 

I joined the Vine program a while ago, and you wouldn't believe the sophmoric intrigue that goes on behind the scenes there. Not to mention, of course, all the public review controversies.

So that's where I'm coming from. 

Anyway, for what it's worth. :)

Nick's picture
Nick from Toronto is reading Adjustment Day March 1, 2013 - 6:55pm

Bottom line, the purpose of the thumbs is really to give your own basic opinion. You like it? Thumbs up! Not so much? Thumbs down. That's it.

 

As fine a judging criteria for a literary contest as I'm aware of.

 

 

ender.che.13's picture
ender.che.13 from Northwestern U.S. living in the southeast peach. is reading Ken Follett March 1, 2013 - 7:09pm

If you just want feedback then there are the workshops. I feel that the competition is what seperates this. Besides, someone is going to win, no matter what higher moral standard anyone holds themselves to beyond the actual rules of the competition. I have to agree with @Michael.Eric.Snyder on this one. Half of the fun is in the competition.

What my add an interesting facet to the whole judging process -as we've all voiced some wariness of the current binary system- would be a targeted rating system. Voice: Up/Down. Writing: Up/Down. Overrall: Up/Down. Etc. You all get the idea.

 

Also, here is my official recommendation of One Tunguska Story

Nathan Scalia's picture
Nathan Scalia from Kansas is reading so many things March 1, 2013 - 7:09pm

I'll say for the record that if you give my story a thumbs down, I won't retaliate. I'll read your story and review it honestly.

'Cause I'm an adult.

Check my profile for my story link.

Adam Soandso's picture
Adam Soandso from the streets of rage is reading graffiti on the bathroom wall March 1, 2013 - 7:27pm

I agree on the tiered rating idea instead of a polarizing Good/Bad. But as you said, there are workshops for more indepth things, which I have neglected to take into account since I haven't become involved in them yet. Though Michael made a pretty good compelling argument for justifying a quick 9 bucks to check it out.

Anyway, moving past the whole rating business, I'm really enjoying this whole thing. I haven't written much prose that I've also shared with another human for a while now, basically just filling my notebooks with exercises and notes. And in the process of trying to come up with a decent story, I wrote a few others that didn't make the cut (and man, were they depressing). So I'm pretty satisfied with the competition thus far. 

Jonathan Riley's picture
Jonathan Riley from Memphis, Tennessee is reading Flashover by Gordon Highland March 1, 2013 - 7:29pm

@Adam,

That's possible I do pay for the workshop membership, but let me try to be more specefic and see if this helps. It's not so much a button as just tiny words. To the far left, right above the blue of the Teleport us background it says "Voting Results" If you put your curser on that it will turn red and you can click to view your rating status.

Kirk's picture
Admin
Kirk from Pingree Grove, IL is reading The Book Of The New Sun March 1, 2013 - 7:31pm

Hey folks,

We identified a few people who were artificially pumping their votes with multiple accounts. Having to identify these people makes Averydoll angry (you don't want to see her angry) and it makes me a sad panda (because I have to verify and then kill your submission and account).

So, that's the long way of saying, Teleport Us is for fun, to challenge you as a writer. But we do look for obvious instances of trying to cheat. If you're caught, you're done. So, don't do it because there is a chance you could have actually come out on top the fair way.

But now

Jonathan Riley's picture
Jonathan Riley from Memphis, Tennessee is reading Flashover by Gordon Highland March 1, 2013 - 7:33pm

@ Ender, giving the thumbs down and explaining why is cooler than not rating it because thumbs downs equal points too. Bravo. If the person can convince you he met the criteria maybe you'll change your vote. Ha, That is for you two to decide. Glad to have you in the comunity. I'd like to read you and Michael's story this weekend too. Time permitting.

Michael.Eric.Snyder's picture
Michael.Eric.Snyder March 1, 2013 - 7:34pm

I do love Willy Wonka, but it's a bitter, self-indulgent, narcissistic kind of love.

Nick's picture
Nick from Toronto is reading Adjustment Day March 1, 2013 - 8:11pm

But we do look for obvious instances of trying to cheat. If you're caught, you're done. So, don't do it because there is a chance you could have actually come out on top the fair way.

Please PM me if my numbers look funny, I'm worried my Mom may find out about this contest and try to jack my score up.

 

(kidding aside, I'm glad someone noticed that... awful lot of near-perfect scores thus far)

Michael.Eric.Snyder's picture
Michael.Eric.Snyder March 1, 2013 - 8:22pm

Jonathon, have a look-see if you like. I think I read where you missed the deadline, so the next time you get a story in workshop, or want a look at an older one, feel free to PM me.

Ender and I have settled our "differences," not that we had any. 

Looking at his scores, he doesn't need my or anyone's endorsement, but The Gorund rocks. If I recall correctly, I think I finished that story wanting my very own to keep close and safe. :)

klahol's picture
klahol from Stockholm, Sweden is reading Black Moon March 1, 2013 - 9:13pm

@Kirk I had the distinct feeling there was some sort of troll scrawling around in the ducts of the voting system. Good work rooting them out. Will you be removing their submitted votes as well? 

Way to win a literary challenge, by the way. To paraphrase Austin Powers:

Scott: "Dad, I want to be an author"

Dr Evil: "An..... evil....author?"

ender.che.13's picture
ender.che.13 from Northwestern U.S. living in the southeast peach. is reading Ken Follett March 1, 2013 - 9:56pm

Oh, my god. The answer's yes. It has to be: http://www.harlem-shake-it.com/

The only way to read stories from here on out. It makes the page do the Harlem Shake.

You are welcome.

Kirk's picture
Admin
Kirk from Pingree Grove, IL is reading The Book Of The New Sun March 1, 2013 - 10:01pm

klahol, it wasn't that big of a deal and was pretty obvious, they weren't being jerks to anyone else, but they were upvoting their own submissions on a bunch of alternate accounts. So please don't bother doing that, people. 

However, it did lead me to notice that we have a minor bug where in certain instances, multiple votes are being recorded by a single user on a single story. What this means is, a story might say it has 4 ratings when in fact it has 3. It's not a huge deal and no data is lost or wrong, there is just a little too much of it. 

So, we should be running a quick fix tomorrow that will solve that at which point some of you may see changes in your rating count and average overall score.

ender.che.13's picture
ender.che.13 from Northwestern U.S. living in the southeast peach. is reading Ken Follett March 1, 2013 - 10:18pm

Well, thank you very much for your endorsement @Michael.Eric.Snyder. You set me straight, though. And, I really like the microcosmic approach you took to the idea. I hadn't thought of it that way.

Also, thanks to the ever-watchful admins for nailing the cheaters. I doubt you have the clout of heart to produce anything of much merit if that's the level of pettiness with which you conduct yourself. The cheaters I mean, not the heroic admins.

EdVaughn's picture
EdVaughn from Louisville, Ky is reading a whole bunch of different stuff March 2, 2013 - 10:27am

Okay so, it looks like my submission got buried under all of the new subs. It only has two reads so far and I wouldn't mind having at least two more before I start rewriting. I'm going to try and read at least one other  submission a day. Only fair. If any of you get a chance I appreciate it.

http://litreactor.com/events/teleport-us/electra 

Matt Hebert's picture
Matt Hebert from Vermont, originally, now in Dublin March 2, 2013 - 5:52pm

@ Jonathan

It's not so much a button as just tiny words. To the far left, right above the blue of the Teleport us background it says "Voting Results" If you put your curser on that it will turn red and you can click to view your rating status.

I'm not a paying member, and I don't have this.  Not sure if the two are related. . . .

***

[Hopefully you can forgive the length. . .]

On the judging and voting front: I started reading and voting before I realized that the results are solely based on the opinions of other hopefuls. I assumed that the folks running the contest/challenge would be the ones to decide if the criteria were met and a submission was qualified to be considered along with the others. All I needed to do was read, decide if I liked it or not, and let the author know what worked or didn't work for me. Easy peasy and enjoyable. :) Voting, yes that too, but not as the sole deciding factor, certainly.

I accept that I got this wrong.

It does seem problematic for one's fellow contributors to decide if one has interpreted the rules correctly, though. I read the thread before the challenge started where Rob Hart gave clear descriptions of what we were supposed to do. [Some of these seem to have been reinterpreted more recently by Rob himself, though, I do grant you.]

He seemed pretty clearly to require that the non-human be the main character. He also says your submission is "locked" once you enter it, which seemed reasonable. Here's the page where I read it: http://litreactor.com/news/teleport-us-litreactors-sci-fi-writing-challenge

I've read a few good stories here where the non-human isn't really the main character, and people took advantage of the ability to edit and resubmit, really improving their stories. I think both of these are great things and lead to better writing, which is the point of the site in the first place. But with things that loose and open to the interpretation of the community, it's really hard to think of this as a contest. For me, anyway.

I was really hoping to get some comments on my writing from whatever quarter, which I have. It's all definitely been worth it, and I've read some cool stuff besides.  But the contest part does seem a bit broken.

Jonathan Riley's picture
Jonathan Riley from Memphis, Tennessee is reading Flashover by Gordon Highland March 2, 2013 - 11:05am

@Matt,

It really isn't a contest. It's a "Challenge." Most of the rewards are based on participation. The goal is to share stories with other writers in hopes to get good feedback to improve your story and to help someone else improve theirs. The prizes are motivaters to participate. Atleast that's how I took it in the Scare Us challenge I entered.

Also Rob did correct himself later in the discussion.


Hey everyone! So, clarification. Kirk mentioned a little further up in this thread that you do have the capability to edit stories after they have been submitted.

Yes, this is true. But going in and editing your story doesn't affect the rankings you've already got--a new version doesn't give you a clean slate.

Hope that helps. 
.

I don't recall Rob saying that the non-human had to be the main character. Where did you read that?

Nathan Scalia's picture
Nathan Scalia from Kansas is reading so many things March 2, 2013 - 11:02am

So I'm finding myself rather wishing for a "random story" button, and for the ranking of the story to not be visible until I've submitted my own decision. I'm doing my best to be objective, but I'm also realizing that once a story has six ratings and only one is positive, I find myself reading it knowing it has issues from the very beginning. Likewise, I've been avoiding some of the highest-ranked stories, because they already have more than enough support, and I certainly don't want to be the first person out of twelve to thumbs-down the story and knock it from its cozy spot on the first or second page.

Just a thought.

Chacron's picture
Chacron from England, South Coast is reading Fool's Assassin by Robin Hobb March 2, 2013 - 11:10am

Matt makes an interesting comment there, I remember reading that once you'd submitted your story it would be locked, yet I'm seeing people posting new versions and edits using the discussion section. Before anyone jumps on me I DON'T OBJECT to this even though I've chosen not to do it myself (I decided I couldn't fix the problems my story has without using more wordcount, so I decided to leave my submission alone). All this makes me wonder is if 'locked' meant that you couldn't withdraw your submssion and try a completely different one. The ability to attach documents to comments allows for the possibility of people editing and altering the same story, the competition organisers must have realised this. All I'm wondering now is will they take the very first submission as the one they judge or the most recent edit?

Besides, the more critics you get the harder it becomes to please everyone. I had one reviewer actually say they were pretty satisfied with my story as it was, and it made me think if I'd changed it based on what some of the others said it might not have been as good for that person (Thanks Ethan, even though I'm a long way from happy with it myself!) A small edit to change a crap sentence or a couple of typos you missed on your edit, or to help something you describe make more sense is fine. Actually altering a story might not be such a good idea. You can only check a parachute so many times before you just have to jump and hope it does what it's supposed to.

Liam Hogan's picture
Liam Hogan from Earth is reading Hugo Nominations March 2, 2013 - 11:15am

@Nathan : Like the idea of a random story!

How are people deciding what to read? I guestimate there's around 160 stories (see the helpful list on page 6 of the discussion board!) and even with a month I don't think I'm going to get through them all! So far, I've read a few that had "No reads yet" status (so that they no longer had that status!) and a couple that gave me comments (people! If you read and don't comment, good or bad, we won't know it was you, will we?!) and a title or two has attracted the eye, but after that, lucky dip would help!

Thanks all for the tips - like the "hold the cursor over the colour bar to see the number of votes" - though alas that doesn't work from the full list of submission page (just the %, which you can see from the bar anyway!) There's a few stories with a lot more comments than votes, so I'm guessing some right old discussions are going on - which is nice!

3 reads so far - and I've read five, but still a month to go ...

Xenophobe

Linda's picture
Linda from Sweden is reading Fearful Symmetries March 2, 2013 - 11:47am

I think the contest aspect should be pushed to the back. It's more of a chance to get your story out there and receive feedback from your peers, and not all who vote are participating in the challenge themselves. Most of the time, I put as much effort into my Teleport Us feedback as I do in the workshop, and I've seen many others do the same. Keeping in mind that the workshop is a privilege that we pay for, this challenge is an amazing opportunity to receive constructive criticism that might help you improve your story, and maybe set you on the right path to getting it published once all this is over. If someone doesn't think my story tick all the boxes, I respect that. But if our admins sorted out every submission that they found didn't meet the criteria, those stories would get no feedback at all, and – since this challenge hopefully doesn't mark the end of your writing endeavors – feedback should be valuable regardless of whether the story in question meets the criteria for the challenge or not. 

 

Moving on. There are several reasons to like these stories, but I especially recommend them if you have a soft spot in your heart for man's best friend:

The Horse with no Head

An incident at Winter House 12

Frank Chapel's picture
Frank Chapel from California is reading Thomas Ligotti's works March 2, 2013 - 11:45am

@jonathan

@matt

Part of the challenge, stated within the challenge itself, is to put us all out of our comfort zone. Thinking up a non-human main character and all that entails i believe added to that challenge.

I am just happy to be involved in all this as it's been extremely helpful. but to state a fact, yes the MC is supposed to be non-human, or become/be revealed as non-human by the end.  You can find Rob clarifying the prompts in the comments section of the original "Teleport Us" announcement.

"Thankeeka:

'Feature a non-human character'

How "featuring" does it need to be? Does that mean the main character has to be this main character? They have to have a sizeable role?"

"Rob:

@thankeeka main character."

 

Jonathan Riley's picture
Jonathan Riley from Memphis, Tennessee is reading Flashover by Gordon Highland March 2, 2013 - 11:51am

I must have missed that one, and actually for me it doesn't matter because most entrants haven't followed this thread, yet only read the rules. As long as there is a non-human character in the story, in my oppinion it meets the criteria provided on the Chalenge announcment page.

 

Michael.Eric.Snyder's picture
Michael.Eric.Snyder March 2, 2013 - 12:10pm

I'd have to agree with Jonathon (and not just because my non-human character isn't the main character, although the main character is certainly inhumane). 

Comments are not mandatory reading, thank goodness, and I would expect a clarification of that sort, indeed if it were "official," to be part of the article itself and not relegated to, as it were, optional reading.

The Powers that Be have left the criteria as vague as possible, just in case some of us would like to put a square peg in the proverbial round hole. 

One Tunguska Story

 

Nick's picture
Nick from Toronto is reading Adjustment Day March 2, 2013 - 12:17pm

Moving on. There are several reasons to like these stories, but I especially recommend them if you have a soft spot in your heart for man's best friend:

The Horse with no Head

An incident at Winter House 12

My story is also about that: http://litreactor.com/events/teleport-us/to-the-dogs

James England's picture
James England from Wilmington, North Carolina is reading Even Cowgirls Get the Blues by Tom Robbins March 2, 2013 - 12:19pm

I just joined Lit Reactor because I saw there was a deadline for submission to Teleport Us and I figured it would be a fun experiment.  It was.  But, after submitting my short story and getting to read some of the others, I was absolutely surprised to see how catty the responses were.  It was almost hilarious.  Sure, some of the stories weren't my cup of tea, but the number of back-handed commentary that came along with those stories was comical in proportion to the written work.  We don't win any money out of this.  I doubt Chuck is going to come down from his castle in the clouds and give the LitVatican kiss of success and, more importantly, I don't see how that would profit anyone.

What I DID like were the writers who spent the time to detail their responses.  Even if the original author disagrees with that commentary, at least it serves as a point of reference.  I remember reading on someone's comments section "You're probably a great writer but you certainly didn't display any of that creativity here" (not verbatim).  Really, Dostoievski?

I certainly hope all the writers who mustered themselves out to a single deadline don't get disappointed and walk away from the craft due to repeated literary kicks-to-the-balls.  Again, while some were not my cup of tea, I would gladly spend the time to read their future works.     

Kirk's picture
Admin
Kirk from Pingree Grove, IL is reading The Book Of The New Sun March 2, 2013 - 12:47pm

@Matt

On the judging and voting front: I started reading and voting before I realized that the results are solely based on the opinions of other hopefuls. I assumed that the folks running the contest/challenge would be the ones to decide if the criteria were met and a submission was qualified to be considered along with the others.

They are not based solely on other hopefuls. In fact, a lot of the readers are people who did not submit anything and during the next few weeks, what we'll do is promote it as such. We encourage everyone to read stories and leave feedback, in fact, a big portion of the "giveaways" will go to people to provide feedback and read stories.

Ultimately, we do decide. But, in truthfulness, we use the community as a filter so we can more easily identify the "top" stories. We have a variety of tools that we use to review ratings, the users who left those ratings, the overall performance of a story, etc.

Again, this is a CHALLENGE before anything else. I know some people view it as a contest but this is specifically why we don't call it or frame it as such. We give away awards because we want to and it's fun. Some of them are awarded to those who have the top-rated stories and some of them are awarded to those who have stories that are rated about 50/50 and still some are awarded at random. This also applies to awards for people writing reviews. Some are random and some are to the people we identify as most helpful. This is also why we don't announce big awesome rewards up front. We want people to participate because it's fun to challenge yourself as a writer, not because you want to win a 4 night trip to Detroit.

So now that submissions are closed, we will go into the phase where we try to get as many people as possible to read as many stories as possible. That begins Monday.

Kirk's picture
Admin
Kirk from Pingree Grove, IL is reading The Book Of The New Sun March 2, 2013 - 12:51pm

@Nathan

So I'm finding myself rather wishing for a "random story" button, and for the ranking of the story to not be visible until I've submitted my own decision.

These are both good ideas and I'll look into them for our next challenge.

ArlaneEnalra's picture
ArlaneEnalra from Texas is reading Right now I'm editing . . .. March 2, 2013 - 1:34pm

@kirk If you and a random story button, it would be nice to have it not pick stories you've already voted on/commented on. Just a thought.

Kirk's picture
Admin
Kirk from Pingree Grove, IL is reading The Book Of The New Sun March 2, 2013 - 3:12pm

Because I liked the idea so much, I went ahead and made a page that will show you a random submission. In theory, it will also filter out those submissions you've already rated.

It's right here

Or, if you're on the main submissions listing page, you shuld see a button you can click to get there.

Cipherscribe's picture
Cipherscribe from Michigan, but all my exes live in Texas. is reading Dragonlance: Dragons of Autumn Twilight March 2, 2013 - 3:37pm

Very cool. I bookmarked it. 

@Kirk: Hey, does the Detroit vacation come with bullet-proof vests and/or a bodyguard? Just wondering.

Shameless plug! http://litreactor.com/events/teleport-us/chip-head

Nathan Scalia's picture
Nathan Scalia from Kansas is reading so many things March 2, 2013 - 6:28pm

In case any of the site people are wondering, yes, this event just convinced me to sign up for a workshop membership.

Ethan Cooper's picture
Ethan Cooper from Longview, TX is reading The Kill Room, Heart-Shaped Box, Dr. Sleep March 2, 2013 - 6:42pm

That random story link is a rainbow of deliciousness, like a mouthful of Skittles.

C Patrick Neagle's picture
C Patrick Neagle from Portland, Oregon is reading words, words, words March 2, 2013 - 8:59pm

Grrr..I'm on a ship at sea and the computer system here is as dystopian as anything written for the Challenge. Heh. Won't let me open .docx documents and there're some really cool titles I want to check out to see if the stories live up. Fortunately, I'm headed back home soon and will hopefully be able to read 'em then.

Sorry, just venting.

On the 'must feature a non-human' thing, I only read the official rules on that and didn't look at any of the comments on the announcement thread. For me, 'feature' was 'must be very important to the story.' That said, I went more with the 'What is it, in the end, that makes a person human?' theme, so I think I'm covered either way. Heh.

But I'd like to know what you guys think if/when you get a chance to read the story.

@Nathan Scalia: Yeah, I've been really impressed with the level and quality of commentary on LitReactor as opposed to some of the other workshopping sites I've visited. I'll be joining the main workshopping side when I get back home, too.

Recommendations (I've been working my way from back of the list to front, so most everyone's probably already read these, but I like 'em a lot): The Machinery of X-Mas, and Implant

--Patrick...

The Human Argument

 

 

David Puerner's picture
David Puerner from Sacramento, Ca is reading The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey March 3, 2013 - 9:03pm

Hey, probably others have asked, but can we get any hints as to what your next writing challenge might be?