Bradley Sands's picture
Bradley Sands from Boston is reading Greil Marcus's The History of Rock 'N' Roll in Ten Songs August 13, 2014 - 11:44am

I'm editing a multi-author anthology called How to Win at Ultravision: A Strategy Guide for Video Games That Don’t Exist. Eraserhead Press will be publishing it. The book is inspired by Jeff Rovin’s How to Win at Nintendo Games and Jorge Luis Borges’ reviews of books that don’t exist.

Submissions are now open. I am looking for mini-strategy guides for games of your own invention. They must be in the range of 1000 words to 5000 words long. Text only. Payment is $10 and a contributor’s copy.

Email submissions to bradleysands@gmail.com.

Here are some links to examples:

A page from How to Win at Nintendo Games

From The Ultimate Game Guide to Life

A piece written by Albie about a game that doesn’t exist (I recommend cutting and pasting it into a MS Word document because it’s otherwise a bit difficult to read)

Bradley Sands's picture
Bradley Sands from Boston is reading Greil Marcus's The History of Rock 'N' Roll in Ten Songs August 13, 2014 - 11:52am

Here is part of my pitch for the book. Perhaps it will inspire some of you:

I’m extremely fond of fiction when they’re told in different forms. The earliest example that I can think of is Jorge Luis Borges reviewing books that didn’t exist. This gave him the opportunity to write about a book that he was passionate about without having to devote months or perhaps years to writing them. He was also a prankster, so he would publish the reviews and pretend that the books existed.

A more recent example of telling a story in a different form is in Stephen Graham Jones’ Demon Theory and The Last Final Girl, where Stephen tells stories in the form of screenplays even though they’re intended to be read as novels.

I’ve also done this sort of thing myself. I wrote a story that’s a screenplay for a Rico Slade movie (inspired by my novella) and a story told in the format of a comic script about two giant monsters who are having a tiff about their relationship (while they are destroying the city). In each case, the script’s fictional author is the main character rather than any of the characters that they are “writing” about.

If someone were to actually make a movie using my Rico Slade screenplay, it would be awful. I feel as if telling stories in different forms like this works best when the “fictional” intended product would be a complete failure if it were actually made according to the script without any alterations.

The thing that excites me the most about stories told in different forms is reading a story that has never been told this way before. It’s new and unique even when it’s based on a preexisting form. I see it as continuing the legacy of Borges in the modern era.

J.C. Wigriff's picture
J.C. Wigriff from Carbondale, IL is reading Playboy (for the articles) August 13, 2014 - 11:48am

What is the deadline for submissions? 

Bradley Sands's picture
Bradley Sands from Boston is reading Greil Marcus's The History of Rock 'N' Roll in Ten Songs August 13, 2014 - 11:59am

Submissions close when it fills. I'm estimating it will take six months.

J.C. Wigriff's picture
J.C. Wigriff from Carbondale, IL is reading Playboy (for the articles) August 13, 2014 - 12:17pm

Alright. I think this project sounds fantastic, and I will definitely do some brainstorming and see if I can come up with something worth submitting. I also called a friend of mine who is a great satirical writer, and this would be right up his alley. He's interested and I'm going to email him all the information. 

J.C. Wigriff's picture
J.C. Wigriff from Carbondale, IL is reading Playboy (for the articles) August 13, 2014 - 12:19pm

P.S. Master of Masturbation is fucking hilarious. 

Bradley Sands's picture
Bradley Sands from Boston is reading Greil Marcus's The History of Rock 'N' Roll in Ten Songs August 13, 2014 - 1:22pm

Cool.

The Ultimate Game Guide to Your Life is a really great book. I think few people bought it. It's out of print now. I bought it on Amazon a few months ago for like $5. I guess it was a remainder of some sort.

L.W. Flouisa's picture
L.W. Flouisa from Tennessee is reading More Murakami August 13, 2014 - 8:24pm

I might consider it, if I can get myself back into other game writing things. (It's been years though.)

Thuggish's picture
Thuggish from Vegas is reading Day of the Jackal August 13, 2014 - 9:27pm

EDIT- never mind

Dwayne's picture
Dwayne from Cincinnati, Ohio (suburbs) is reading books that rotate to often to keep this updated August 16, 2014 - 3:27pm

Can we do a review of something we think they will make sooner or later, in general terms?

Nathan Scalia's picture
Nathan Scalia from Kansas is reading so many things August 17, 2014 - 5:12am

I might try my hand at this. It would justify the years I've spent playing video games, at least.

Bradley Sands's picture
Bradley Sands from Boston is reading Greil Marcus's The History of Rock 'N' Roll in Ten Songs August 20, 2014 - 1:19pm

No, Dwayne. No reviews. Just guides.

Neil Sanzari's picture
Neil Sanzari from NJ is reading After The People Lights Have Gone Off by Stephen Graham Jones August 25, 2014 - 2:21pm

Hello Bradley, are these reviews by Borges of books that don't exist to be found in Ficciones? And if so, which review in particular inspires you the most?

Joshua Chaplinsky's picture
Joshua Chaplinsky from New York is reading Stories of YOUR Life August 25, 2014 - 2:59pm

This sounds fun and/or cool.

I'm curious, Brad. Do you guys do a lot of open calls like this? Will our favorite Eraserhead writers also be contributing?

Aud Fontaine's picture
Aud Fontaine from the mountains is reading Catch-22. Since like, always. August 25, 2014 - 3:23pm

What's an Eraserhead writer and is it as glorious as it sounds?

Neil Sanzari's picture
Neil Sanzari from NJ is reading After The People Lights Have Gone Off by Stephen Graham Jones August 25, 2014 - 7:54pm

Aud, prepare yourself. Your mind is about to be blown away, as you delve deeper into layer upon layer of understanding. Eraserhead Press is the premiere publisher for the Bizarro genre. And Bizarro is the shiznit of all shiznitz. Haha?!

Aud Fontaine's picture
Aud Fontaine from the mountains is reading Catch-22. Since like, always. August 25, 2014 - 8:46pm

Is this "bizarro" the book form of the surrealist movement because if so I am about to be all about that shit. 

Thuggish's picture
Thuggish from Vegas is reading Day of the Jackal August 25, 2014 - 9:13pm

If I could come up with aaaanythign I'd jump on this.

Neil Sanzari's picture
Neil Sanzari from NJ is reading After The People Lights Have Gone Off by Stephen Graham Jones August 25, 2014 - 9:53pm

Although surrealism plays a major role within the anatomy of Bizarro, there's a whole lot more to it than that. I guess the quickest way to show you what Bizarro is is tell you that the best Bizarro directors are David Lynch, David Cronenberg and Alexandro Jodorowsky. For instance, my favorite moment in Bizarro film history is when Robert Blake's Mystery Man accosts Bill Pullman at a party in Lynch's Lost Highway.

Aud Fontaine's picture
Aud Fontaine from the mountains is reading Catch-22. Since like, always. August 25, 2014 - 10:25pm

That's so weird, I've always associated Lynch with surrealism. How does bizarro differ? I can't say I've seen much Cronenberg or even heard of Jodorowsky but I've seen just about all of Lynch's work with the exception of Lost Highway and the second half of Inland Empire. What classifies him as bizarro as opposed to surrealist? Are Bunuel and Svankmajer bizarro too? How much crossover is there between the genres? I looked it up on Wikipedia and pretty much the only helpful thing I got there is that I really need to get around to reading Gogol. Sorry about all the questions, it's just not every day that you find out about a whole new genre.

Neil Sanzari's picture
Neil Sanzari from NJ is reading After The People Lights Have Gone Off by Stephen Graham Jones August 26, 2014 - 5:11am

Nothing wrong with questions, but there are some things I do know. And some things I don't. I only just started researching Bizarro myself this past year. And I'm sorry I wasn't clear. Lynch and Bizarro most definitely have surrealistic qualities, but in my opinion these idioms go well beyond the definition of surrealism. Cronenburg is like the father of body horror from Videodrome to the Fly. And a documentary called Jodorowsky's Dune came out in April, which is the making of the greatest movie that never was.

Bradley Sands's picture
Bradley Sands from Boston is reading Greil Marcus's The History of Rock 'N' Roll in Ten Songs August 26, 2014 - 11:38am

I don't recall which Borges books they're from. I think they're in a few different books.

I can't remember another open submissions call for an Eraserhead Press anthology. This might be the first.

mavtj's picture
mavtj from London is reading Burnt Tongues / The Living Dead / way too many craft essays September 12, 2014 - 9:32am

Bradley,

 

Do you want guides for games with technology of the UltraVision era and vibe (as alluded to in the anthology title)?  Or more open to fictional games with a contemporary/"future" technology?

Bradley Sands's picture
Bradley Sands from Boston is reading Greil Marcus's The History of Rock 'N' Roll in Ten Songs September 15, 2014 - 11:07am

Either, but old school would be better.

mavtj's picture
mavtj from London is reading Burnt Tongues / The Living Dead / way too many craft essays September 17, 2014 - 7:24pm

Thanks. A very exciting opportunity with plenty of scope. Rather than add to what you've already stated to be after, is there anything you're NOT looking for?

Bradley Sands's picture
Bradley Sands from Boston is reading Greil Marcus's The History of Rock 'N' Roll in Ten Songs September 19, 2014 - 12:04pm

Pieces that would be appropriate for a conventional strategy guide. I want the pieces to describe games that would never actually exist rather than read as if they actually do.

Jenn Collins's picture
Jenn Collins from Wisconsin, USA is reading Spunk and Bite October 6, 2014 - 7:09am

Good lord, this sounds fun.  I'll have to think on it.