Joshua Chaplinsky's picture
Joshua Chaplinsky from New York is reading Stories of YOUR Life October 2, 2013 - 2:47pm

Thanks for the info, Fred. Having two different versions is going to make for an interesting read.

TW Brown's picture
TW Brown from Portland, Oregon is reading Zombie Fallout 7 October 3, 2013 - 5:51am

Just raising my hand to indicate that I am sitting in the back of the room and here in full support of the amazing Booked Anthology. To all of my fellow contributors, if you are interested in being featured as a guest on my blog, you can copy the questions you find here: http://twbrown.blogspot.com/p/so-you-want-to-be-guest-on-my-blog.html

Then, just email your responses to me at twbrown.maydecpub@gmail.com. I will take them in the order I get them and bang the antho drum over the next several weeks until everybody gets a turn.

Anthony David Jacques's picture
Anthony David J... from The Internet is reading two or three books at once. October 3, 2013 - 7:41am

I'm hanging around here as well, and I'll try to chime in as the conversation moves forward. 

Good stuff so far!

manda lynn's picture
manda lynn from Ohio is reading Of Love and Other Demons (again) October 3, 2013 - 8:07am

Clevenger's The Confession of Adelai Shade was a surprising story in how different it feels from the rest of the man's writing, but in how simple and how much it just worked.

yeah, definitely! It was like he was trying on a brand new coat, and it fit perfectly. 

CameronPierce's picture
CameronPierce from Astoria, Oregon is reading Repo Shark by Cody Goodfellow October 3, 2013 - 3:44pm

Josh, I haven't seen Sliding Doors, but the comparison of "California Oregon" to a Gwyneth Paltrow movie cracks me up. 

Axel Taiari's picture
Axel Taiari from Paris, France is reading Paradise Lost October 4, 2013 - 12:53pm

Clevenger's The Confession of Adelai Shade was a surprising story in how different it feels from the rest of the man's writing, but in how simple and how much it just worked. The voice was perfect, and it just made since in a weird way.

Yeah. I mean, I think the thing about Clevenger is that a lot of people see him as a "noir" or "crime" writer with a distinctive voice, when in fact he's a writer with distinctive voices. When you go back and compare The Contortionist's Handbook to Dermaphoria, then move on to what little we've seen of Mother Howl, to short stories like Act Of Contrition and Mercury--it's terribly obvious. The prose is always razor-sharp, and the descriptions are particularly vivid, but the voices themselves keep changing from setting to setting, character to character, story to story, and yet they never ring false. It's really impressive to read. 

Richard's picture
Richard from St. Louis is reading various anthologies October 4, 2013 - 12:56pm

^^for sure, axel

chrisdeal's picture
chrisdeal from NC is reading The Maid's Version October 4, 2013 - 1:04pm

Yeah. I mean, I think the thing about Clevenger is that a lot of people see him as a "noir" or "crime" writer with a distinctive voice, when in fact he's a writer with distinctive voices. When you go back and compare The Contortionist's Handbook to Dermaphoria, then move on to what little we've seen of Mother Howl, to short stories like Act Of Contrition and Mercury--it's terribly obvious. The prose is always razor-sharp, and the descriptions are particularly vivid, but the voices themselves keep changing from setting to setting, character to character, story to story, and yet they never ring false. It's really impressive to read.

Indeed. This story, it is an indication that whatever you want to call Clevenger, whatever genre he calls home for a piece, he owns it, as well as transcends it. I'll go out on a limb here and assume that most reading these words, they've read at least The Contortionist's Handbook, most likely Dermaphoria as well, and they'll know the man, he can write, he's got that down, but he can write whatever the bloody hell he wants and it will be good. Still hyped up that Mother Howl is written.

Also, Axel, I dig your story. Kind of like a different view of a video game, but so much more, the world you created. My friend, I love you.

NikKorpon's picture
NikKorpon from Baltimore is reading Book and books and books and October 4, 2013 - 3:27pm

I think it's akin to Woodrell. He gets painted by us as country noir, Ozark noir, whatever whatever, but really ge just tells a great story really well.

robb's picture
robb from Chicago is reading Doctor Sleep October 4, 2013 - 5:06pm

Chris! One of my favorite quotes as well. We made some sweet images to promote them. Here's Fred's:

TW Brown's picture
TW Brown from Portland, Oregon is reading Zombie Fallout 7 October 5, 2013 - 6:27am

I thought you would enjoy the "I love children...they taste like chicken." line :-)

TW Brown's picture
TW Brown from Portland, Oregon is reading Zombie Fallout 7 October 5, 2013 - 7:32am

Monday, October 7th, Booked Anthology contributor Chris Deal is featured on my blog. So come check out what he has to say. And remember contributors, there is a set of questions in place if you wish to featured as well.

manda lynn's picture
manda lynn from Ohio is reading Of Love and Other Demons (again) October 6, 2013 - 2:24pm

The Mulligan by Joshua Alan Doetsch is easily in my top 5. So good I want to make him be my friend.

Bob Pastorella's picture
Bob Pastorella from Groves, Texas is reading murder books trying to stay hip, I'm thinking of you, and you're out there so Say your prayers, Say your prayers, Say your prayers October 6, 2013 - 3:24pm

The Mulligan by Joshua Alan Doetsch is easily in my top 5. So good I want to make him be my friend.

That one is definitely in my top stories for the collection. So much going, but mostly it's that voice. It gets in your head and nestles there, whispering, and the things it says. Love that one. 

manda lynn's picture
manda lynn from Ohio is reading Of Love and Other Demons (again) October 6, 2013 - 3:47pm

Yes!! That child-voice that says all the horrible things with half-innocent matter-of-factness. And that writing magic that always impresses me, when a 1st person perspective still manages to convey information to you that the narrator doesn't know. That story is a wonder.

Joshua Alan Doetsch's picture
Joshua Alan Doetsch October 6, 2013 - 8:55pm

My name was invoked twice (I'm faster than Beetlejuice)! Salutations, all. Thank you, Manda. You can certainly be my friend. "The Mulligan" actually started as that voice, no plot, no mythology. Just the voice saying that first line. And I liked talking outloud in that voice...so I wrote a whole storyt that would allow me to do so.

Bob Pastorella's picture
Bob Pastorella from Groves, Texas is reading murder books trying to stay hip, I'm thinking of you, and you're out there so Say your prayers, Say your prayers, Say your prayers October 7, 2013 - 5:21am

 "The Mulligan" actually started as that voice, no plot, no mythology. Just the voice saying that first line. And I liked talking outloud in that voice...so I wrote a whole storyt that would allow me to do so.

Usually I cannot get started on a story until I hear 'the voice'. Whether 3rd person or 1st person POV, I must hear it talking to me, and once it starts, then I have to write it. Sometimes the voice will lead you astray, and I still haven't learned how to completely trust it, especially compared to how I think the story should go, but when I do trust it, and I follow the lead, those are my favorite stories. Other times...well those stories are in a special folder called 'Broken'. It's full of messed up stories.

Joshua, I know you started with the voice, but is 'The Mulligan' more of the voice leading the way, or did you fit it into the story you wanted to write?

Joshua Alan Doetsch's picture
Joshua Alan Doetsch October 7, 2013 - 10:04am

Joshua, I know you started with the voice, but is 'The Mulligan' more of the voice leading the way, or did you fit it into the story you wanted to write?

Hmmm... It certainly started with the voice, and Little M's rhythm led the shape of the story. I think at some point, I then fit in that voice and rhythm into the story I wanted to tell, taking bits from that particular mythology (that I won't spoil here) and fitting it into a tale about a little boy and his mother and school and lunch boxes. I guess those are the things that started and propelled the story.

Unexpected discoveries also popped up and drove this one. For example, my early concept was of a nastier, more abusive Mrs. Bates sort of a mother that kept Little M locked in the basement much of the time and taught him through harsh trial. But when I actually wrote it, I discovered that (despite certain dark insinuations) she was a rather good, attentive mother. I got a good response to her when I tested an earlier draft at an open mic, so kept to that choice.

It's a lesson I've learned and re-learned. I think I can do pretty good straight-up, nasty horror. But there are others who do that a lot better than me, and I think my niche, the storytelling space that I tend to have the most to contribute to, is when I give the twisted bits some unexpected heart. Little M and his mother are adorable together (even though they're frightful creatures).

Kevin Lynn Helmick's picture
Kevin Lynn Helmick from Lake Villa IL is reading Train, Pete Dexter October 7, 2013 - 3:34pm

Mulligan was one of my favorites too, mostly because it was so unusual, yet almost Poe-ish. It kinda took me back to certain childrens books scaring the hell out of me when I was little. And not because they were suppose to be scary, they just were.  The voice and the vibe just resonates a contented insanity.

chrisdeal's picture
chrisdeal from NC is reading The Maid's Version October 8, 2013 - 5:23am

Sean Ferguson has been doing reviews of each story from the collect over at his website. Very cool stuff. Check out his most recent of Caleb Ross's The Removal Kind.

Bob Pastorella's picture
Bob Pastorella from Groves, Texas is reading murder books trying to stay hip, I'm thinking of you, and you're out there so Say your prayers, Say your prayers, Say your prayers October 10, 2013 - 7:21pm

I'm going to take a minute out to talk about Michael Paul Gonzalez and his story "One Shot (Only God Knows)" If Fred's story was the one to hit the ball out of the park, Michael's story was the runner hitting home plate. What a way to end the collection. Well, the proper end. Pela's story in the ebook version is the bomb and definitely not taking anything away from her. Plus lately there's been some Facebook chatter from some peeps, most recently Ellen Datlow, whom I have the utmost respect for, but completely disagree with her stance concerning editors placing their own stories in collections. THAT'S a whole other discussion, but yeah, fuck 'em if they don't want to read the editor's story. 

Anyway, back to Michael's story. When I first hit it, I groaned...not another 1st person romp. Fortunately,  Michael writes in this visual, visceral style that pulled me in very quickly. What fascinated me the most was his ability to take something so dystopian and make it come from the heart, and it was about one of the universal questions every single one of us think about. The story moves along, getting us up to speed with everything after that first scene and never lets us go until the end, when it comes around full circle, and knocks the wind right out of your chest. 

I keep thinking synchronicity and grace. The pacing was impecable, and everything fit like a Swiss watch, graceful and effortless. This one is definitely one of my favorites of the whole collection. Thanks for the story, Michael. 

chrisdeal's picture
chrisdeal from NC is reading The Maid's Version October 11, 2013 - 5:05am

I remember reading that story first it feels like a long time ago. It really worked then, and it still does. I think it's better here then where it was originally intended for, but yeah, Michael can really do his thing, and he does it well.

Gordon Highland's picture
Gordon Highland from Kansas City is reading Secondhand Souls by Christopher Moore October 11, 2013 - 5:35am

I love when a title takes on enhanced meaning once you've read its story, and that's certainly the case here. MPG (or Muh-Pug, as Ron Burgundy might say) is one of the most polished and commercially appealing writers I know. He'd better be, for a story this long. haha. But yeah, I agree, way to close things out on a high note.

Bob Pastorella's picture
Bob Pastorella from Groves, Texas is reading murder books trying to stay hip, I'm thinking of you, and you're out there so Say your prayers, Say your prayers, Say your prayers October 12, 2013 - 10:40am

Couple of things:

First, gonna go all Candyman/Beetlejuice here and invoke Nikki Guerlain now. Nikki, Nikki, Nikki, Nikki, dare I say it again...Nikki! I LOVED her story, CHILDREN OF THE WETLANDS. It was icky and gory and nightmarishly beautiful. A real talent. She implanted some images in my brain that will not leave, which is both good and bad, as I love that kind of stuff and I have an overactive imagination, so that stuff makes it into my dreams. 

Second, what is the deal with people hating on editors including their own stories in a collection? I can see if their particular story sucked donkey balls, but what if their story is one of the best out of the whole bunch? There are readers that say they will not read an anthology if the editor includes one of their own stories. I feel that's judgemental and all kinds of unfair. Reviewing a collection you have a story in is one thing, and I'm definitely on the fence about that, but if the editor has the chops, readers may be missing out on a real treat by feeling there's some sort of implied 'conflict of interest'. 

Gordon Highland's picture
Gordon Highland from Kansas City is reading Secondhand Souls by Christopher Moore October 12, 2013 - 10:52am

It depends on the circumstances. If there was a wide call for submissions, and the anthology is supposed to be like a contest of the best stories culled from that large pool, then yeah, seems pretty self-serving. Then again, the editor's the one shepherding the project, maybe sees it as their labor of love and feels deserving, so in that case I'd say they're taking their chances and will have to live with whatever love or criticism comes for their contribution. But something like this one, it's by invitation because of people's prior involvement, so it makes total sense. And I've seen other anthologies that are community-based, which I'd say is fine, too, even if at the expense of some that weren't selected.

Bob Pastorella's picture
Bob Pastorella from Groves, Texas is reading murder books trying to stay hip, I'm thinking of you, and you're out there so Say your prayers, Say your prayers, Say your prayers October 13, 2013 - 11:55am

It just seems that only when it comes to writing that people feel editor's stories included in their own collections are self-serving. With film, nobody bitches if the director, which is a similar position as the editor of a collection, decides to act in the film they are directing. You never hear people say, "Man, I wanted to see The Town, but just couldn't watch it because Affleck is in too many scenes...damn directors acting in their own movies!" Same for music. "Could never listen to Santuary's first album, damn Dave Mustaine shredding on that first song. Producers shredding on their own records, hmmmp."

Editor places their own story in a collection? It's the end of the fucking world! 

Makes no sense at all to me, just my opinion. 

Gordon Highland's picture
Gordon Highland from Kansas City is reading Secondhand Souls by Christopher Moore October 13, 2013 - 7:13am

A similar argument could be made for why self-published authors have a stigma not usually applied to celebrated DIY musicians and filmmakers. But hey, I'm getting off track. How 'bout them bonus stories in the e-book, eh? Pretty good stuff.

Bob Pastorella's picture
Bob Pastorella from Groves, Texas is reading murder books trying to stay hip, I'm thinking of you, and you're out there so Say your prayers, Say your prayers, Say your prayers October 13, 2013 - 11:58am

YES, and in a roundabout way, makes my final point. Robb Olson's story was fantastic. He can write, and needs to do so more often. So here's an excellent 'Editor in the mix', example, because the world is a much better place with his words, his fiction, between the pages of a book he co-edited. 

Livius Nedin's picture
Livius Nedin from Chicago, IL is reading Murder As A Fine Art October 13, 2013 - 1:23pm

I'm glad somebody finally mentioned Nikki's story. Hers comes up in conversation as much as Josh's and Fred's. Someone's going to have to shake the Facebook tree to get her on here to explain herself. 

As far as the decision to include stories from Pela and Robb, we felt it would be nice to offer some bonus content in the ebook and they both qualified, having been on the podcast. When we asked Pela for a story for the print version, she politely (or not so politley) declined for the reasons stated above (I think). As far as Robb goes, there just weren;t enough dildos in the collection (literal ones).

Nikki Guerlain's picture
Nikki Guerlain from Portlandia is reading Necronomicon Book Three October 13, 2013 - 9:27pm

Sorry I haven't been around much. Doing some catch up. I've only gotten to read a few of the stories so far and they are all really stellar and the book looks beautiful. With regards to the editor including their own stories I think people slagging on them is total B.S. if the story is really good then it doesn't really matter. I think younger readers don't so much have a problem with it because the whole publishing climate has changed. I very much look forward to reading everyone's stories and feel very lucky to be in this collection. :-)

Sean P. Ferguson's picture
Sean P. Ferguson October 14, 2013 - 5:13am

How about Seth Harwood's story? That man broke my heart with the first brother in the backyard, and then he kicked me in the teeth behind the pool hall.

That line to Duncan, something about, "I thought we were friends..." When I read, I usually hear my own voice in sort of a hushed tone, but when I read that line, it was someone else's voice in my head, and I simply didn't want to read anymore. I couldn't look at the book after this story for hours, like I'd resigned myself to the fact that I was done with the book and could go no further.

That's powerful.

Bob Pastorella's picture
Bob Pastorella from Groves, Texas is reading murder books trying to stay hip, I'm thinking of you, and you're out there so Say your prayers, Say your prayers, Say your prayers October 14, 2013 - 5:36am

Yeah, I liked that story a lot myself. 

manda lynn's picture
manda lynn from Ohio is reading Of Love and Other Demons (again) October 14, 2013 - 6:31am

Yes! That story threw me. It hung onto me for a long time - and the part, that almost guilty self-confession - that there had been a little while that he'd actually been happy, and it was because of her, the happiness, and somehow that making all of it so much worse, the idea that all of this came from two people's happiness, that there was a little more than just lust. And it all had to be atoned for....ugh. Yeah, powerful.

Pete's picture
Pete from Detroit is reading Red Dragon October 14, 2013 - 10:03am

Glad to see you made it in here Nikki.

I'm about halfway through the collection. It's taking me way longer to read than I thought it would, but for a good reason. Every time I finish a story, I put the book (nook) down and say, "I can't start the next story right after that!" Each has been so good I just want to sit on it for a minute.

About editors putting their own stories in a collection - I think that there is no argument that can prove it's tackie (tacky?) if there is more than one editor.

manda lynn's picture
manda lynn from Ohio is reading Of Love and Other Demons (again) October 14, 2013 - 10:13am

About editors putting their own stories in a collection - I think that there is no argument that can prove it's tackie (tacky?) if there is more than one editor.

Mike and I put a story of mine in Cipher, it never even occurred to me it was something you shouldn't do, if, you know, it's good and fits.

 

On topic : yeah, I'm not finished either! I just finished Gordon's - and it's fantastic. The shift-to-camera type POV was great, when he as looking down the aisle, and the description of the way the focus was on the wrong place in the picture with the horse. Those were my two favorite parts.

Deets999's picture
Deets999 from Connecticut is reading Adjustment Day October 15, 2013 - 5:54pm

Really glad I ordered this book - great collection that I couldn't put down!!

Bob Pastorella's picture
Bob Pastorella from Groves, Texas is reading murder books trying to stay hip, I'm thinking of you, and you're out there so Say your prayers, Say your prayers, Say your prayers October 15, 2013 - 6:47pm

@ Deets--glad you liked it. 

robb's picture
robb from Chicago is reading Doctor Sleep October 15, 2013 - 9:49pm

Robb Olson's story was fantastic. He can write, and needs to do so more often. So here's an excellent 'Editor in the mix', example, because the world is a much better place with his words, his fiction, between the pages of a book he co-edited.

Aww Bob. Thanks for the crazy kind words. I'm glad you liked the story.

As for The Booked. Anthology, there was a conversation around whether we should put stories in from us. Pela flat out refused the idea when we brought her on board as Editor. It was certainly not even an option to have us put our own work in the main body of the collection. Not necessarily because we don't think it should happen, but because much like the podcast, we were a venue to showcase incredible talent. We were acting as the platform, not as part of the collaboration. 

When it came time to put the ebook together, there's a lot of things to consider. The conversation came up about whether we wanted to put something extra into it as a bonus, and we were excited about the idea, but we were already doing the <SPOILER ALERT> bonus podcast </SPOILER ALERT> so we needed something different. I had my story laying around and it wasn't being considered anyhwere, and so we decided that we'd just put a couple more stories in. Mine and Pela's. Liv wasn't interested in writing a story for the collection, which is totally cool. 

Overall, I think the question of whether editors should appear in their own collections does not have a simple yes or no answer. Everything from the submission guidelines to the title can help to guide that decision. I haven't really run across a collection where the editor has been included where I considered it a mistake, so I'm sure it's mostly a non-issue. 

Again, I appreciate the nod my story just got, but I'm fiercely proud of the main TOC, and am so thankful that everyone trusted us with their words. I hope we did them some justice.

Gordon Highland's picture
Gordon Highland from Kansas City is reading Secondhand Souls by Christopher Moore October 17, 2013 - 10:35am

I just finished Gordon's - and it's fantastic. The shift-to-camera type POV was great, when he as looking down the aisle, and the description of the way the focus was on the wrong place in the picture with the horse. Those were my two favorite parts.

Thanks, Manda; cool to hear someone dug it. Given the story's photographic and periphery themes, I implemented a ton of lensy metaphors and devices into its telling. One could probably make a drinking game out of it.

Bob Pastorella's picture
Bob Pastorella from Groves, Texas is reading murder books trying to stay hip, I'm thinking of you, and you're out there so Say your prayers, Say your prayers, Say your prayers October 21, 2013 - 6:57am

Is everyone liking the Tumblr pictures? I LOVE them. I tend to writing while listening to music and looking at pictures to help get my mind right for the scene, call it inspiration or whatever, it helps me a lot. I used to really like the silence, but I find that if I can get into some imagery with the proper music, my word count goes a little higher. Do the Tumblr pictures combined with the quotes give you feelings for the stories, enhancing the experience? I think it does. 

Richard's picture
Richard from St. Louis is reading various anthologies October 21, 2013 - 8:01am

i love the tumblr, it's very cool. 

chrisdeal's picture
chrisdeal from NC is reading The Maid's Version October 21, 2013 - 3:40pm

Gorden, I really dug "Bokeh." Specifically, the writing was top notch, which is the norm for your work. I think it's the obfuscating simplicity. If feels like there isn't a lot going on, but take a gander below the surface and boom, so much more.

Sean Ferguson's "Two Dollar Beer Nights" is just wonderful. WRITE MORE.

"Short Tendon" by Amanda Gowin. She can write so damned well.

Pete's picture
Pete from Detroit is reading Red Dragon October 22, 2013 - 11:25am

I still can't read the phrase - "stubbled muffin" - without laughing.

Gordon Highland's picture
Gordon Highland from Kansas City is reading Secondhand Souls by Christopher Moore October 22, 2013 - 3:53pm

Thanks, Chris and Pete. I'm always trying to embed things for reread value, whether that's foreshadowing or wordplay or thematic imagery. Some stories it works better than others.

Funny story behind the "stubbled muffin" origin, which you may've heard on the podcast. I had a different line there originally that was pretty lame, because I'm uncomfortable describing ladyparts (they always seem either too clinical or too crude), and Pela the editor called me out on said lameness. When she refused to offer any replacement suggestions, I was like, "Fine, then, take this!" While its assonance is amusing, it's also an accurate description, that bristly beaver or fuzzy fanny.

I just now realized that in both Booked and Warmed and Bound, the sequencing was such that each of my stories were followed by one from Ferg. Either I'm warming you up for him, or he's cleansing your palate of me. Speaking of: Ferg, was there a real-life inspiration for your story? It's certainly relatable, that desperate prayer for an escape hatch or fireman's pole in the morning light of regret.

Pete's picture
Pete from Detroit is reading Red Dragon October 22, 2013 - 6:48pm

I just keep thinking back on that ManArchy discussion. And then Richard's comments. And how it was all a downward spiral. Mostly because of that phrase.

Richard's picture
Richard from St. Louis is reading various anthologies October 22, 2013 - 7:14pm

lol

Sean P. Ferguson's picture
Sean P. Ferguson October 22, 2013 - 11:25pm

Jesus, Gordon, you're leading the witness. But first -

My favorite description of lady parts, I was watching some movie super early in the morning on Prism (remember THAT channel?), and a character is describing his new, much younger, model, girlfriend while we watch her slowly shower, and he says that her fun-hole reminds him of "a baby's mouth."  Yup...

Anyhoodles, yes. The girl in my story is real. I mean, obviously she isn't a zombie-esque type person, literally, but her bed was the worst to get out of. It was one of those memory foam joints in a frame where the sleeping surface is a foot and a half off of the floor, and the frame is flush with the top of the mattress, and she has stacks of my books all over the floor...yea, its all real.

Bob Pastorella's picture
Bob Pastorella from Groves, Texas is reading murder books trying to stay hip, I'm thinking of you, and you're out there so Say your prayers, Say your prayers, Say your prayers October 25, 2013 - 9:48am

 Paul Tremblay's SCENES FROM THE CITY OF GARBAGE AND THE CITY OF CLAY.

Blown away! I love how Paul lured me in with the wholly familar characters in such a way that I did not know who they were. No spoilers here, but if you haven't read this story, you need to read this story. It's like an alternate or parallel history, but not really, and it doesn't sink in until the end, which makes it even more powerful. The story lingers for days, weeks, months. Handled any other way, with any other writer, this concept would have been spoiled for the reader very early, or blown out of proportion by the end. Instead, the cues are subtle, invisible but there the whole time you read, and then when he lets you have it, it's a moment of pure bliss. 

Damn, I LOVED this story. 

 

 

 

Pete's picture
Pete from Detroit is reading Red Dragon October 25, 2013 - 10:08am

Bob, I really liked that story too.

I was totally surprised by TW Browne's Faces on the Milk Carton. I've never read anything by him, but I will be looking for more of his stuff now.

I just finished Dwyer's story last night. Loved it.

And David James Keaton's story right before it. The voice on that story was great.

Once I finish, I plan on running through the book and trying to comment a bit on every story.

Joshua Alan Doetsch's picture
Joshua Alan Doetsch October 25, 2013 - 11:33am

I'm loving the tumblr pictures, by the by.

In fact, it inspired me to combine image, words, and music for a Mulligan intro...