taralara's picture
taralara from Minneapolis is reading We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo March 29, 2012 - 6:49am

Hello! I'm new around here. Liking it very much, though.

 

Most of the poetry I see getting published these days, both online and in print is...almost like prose. Not that I don't enjoy it...I do. However, it seems a lot of modern poetry writing that gets attention today is beyond blunt. I don't think I could ever (or would ever want to) talk about my bloody tampons or use the word 'fuck' gratuitiously to make a point in a poem. To those who can execute that well: kudos.

Is there no longer a space for classic confessional poetry? Did too many of us angsty college girls try to impersonate things like "Mad Girl's Love Song," so now no one is interested or can take confessional poetry seriously?

I guess I'm refusing to believe it. You can always bring literary life back from the dead, right?

Any other confessional poets out there...holler.

Matt Attack's picture
Matt Attack from Richmond, Va. is reading As I Lay Dying, William Faulkner March 29, 2012 - 7:03am

Welcome! Dave should be along with the welcome Jazz. Literary and confessional never died. Holla! But there is a lot of shitty college girl poerty out there. 

Also, enjoy this. 

avery of the dead's picture
avery of the dead from Kentucky is reading Cipher Sisters March 29, 2012 - 7:09am

I don't know a girl who didn't write confessional poetry in high school or college - so that probably accounts for the feelings about it.  There is a flood of it. 

But I don't think it is dead, it's just harder to find the gems in all the rubble I guess. 

taralara's picture
taralara from Minneapolis is reading We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo March 29, 2012 - 7:27am

Good call, Avery. Indeed.

Nikki Guerlain's picture
Nikki Guerlain from Portlandia is reading Necronomicon Book Three March 29, 2012 - 11:07am

I doubt that the me generation will let confessional poetry die. Take heart and welcome!

jyh's picture
jyh from VA is reading whatever he feels like March 29, 2012 - 11:34am

Most of the poetry I see getting published these days, both online and in print is...almost like prose.

I've also noticed this.  Is it just flash fiction in unusual type-setting?  What makes it poetry?  Or what makes something prosaic (i.e. lacking in poetic qualities)?  Surely it's not just the absence of rhyme and flowery language...

As far as confessional poetry goes, I don't mind it being less prevalent -- I'd like to be able to write a poem in first person and not have people assume I'm actually baring my soul.

Arturo Bandini's picture
Arturo Bandini from Denver, CO is reading Beautiful Ruins March 29, 2012 - 1:15pm

I don't think anything in literature is ever dead. It seems like it's all the same cycles just about everything else in pop culture goes through.

Many critics and reviewers have made similar comments about how American poetry changed after Bukowski's influence. This seems to be pretty much true. That also might explain why other forms seem to have "died".

jennydecki's picture
jennydecki from Chicagoland is reading The Foreigners March 29, 2012 - 1:45pm

I agree with the "gems in the rubble" comment. Also, I've seen some really bad confessional poetry written by boys in college and beyond. It is not just a girl thing.

Chester Pane's picture
Chester Pane from Portland, Oregon is reading The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz March 29, 2012 - 2:23pm

Hi there:

Yes, what these guys all said. Things do die though. And others are simply forgotten waiting to be resurrected.

All it really comes down to though, is not whether or not something is deemed dead by the masses because it only takes one stunning voice to give something life and reinvigorate it. If your voice is channeled through a particular form or genre then by all means follow it wherever it wants to go.

That is the only way to create anything genuine anyway.

 

Fylh's picture
Fylh from from from is reading is from is reading is reading is reading reading is reading March 29, 2012 - 3:27pm

I need:
Kerosene smell
Stay away from balconies
Jesus Help The Living
It is too simple
In the grave
Proffered

Nikki Guerlain's picture
Nikki Guerlain from Portlandia is reading Necronomicon Book Three March 30, 2012 - 12:24pm

Geez I wish egmont would grace us with some confessional poetry...

Matt Attack's picture
Matt Attack from Richmond, Va. is reading As I Lay Dying, William Faulkner March 30, 2012 - 12:52pm

It would be about boobs and sugs....I look forward to  his epic 'pomes'

Nikki Guerlain's picture
Nikki Guerlain from Portlandia is reading Necronomicon Book Three March 30, 2012 - 1:47pm

Me too!!!

jyh's picture
jyh from VA is reading whatever he feels like March 30, 2012 - 2:26pm

leggoe boobs are better than reel boobs

If I could build a bridge out of leggoes, it would be paved with boobs

it would lead to boobs

leggoe boobs

jyh's picture
jyh from VA is reading whatever he feels like March 30, 2012 - 2:27pm

A pale imitation, I know.  Speak of the devil and cross your fingers...

TS's picture
TS March 30, 2012 - 2:35pm

You're talking my bread and butter or lack thereof as poetry doesn't pay very well for the living, most of the time. Confessional style, first person writing is what I cut my teeth on. I don't know that it's dead, at all.  I am  not a fan of Plath, though Sexton for sure, have referenced her often in my work. Another lesser known, more romantic, lyrical poet is Sara Teasdale, somewhat farther back. Though these days, I consider Poe to be confessional.

It can be a slippery...ledge.

If you like that kind of work, link my page. 

Soverane

winsomevein.com

http://www.winsomevein.com/p/latittude.html

And directly to a poem.

http://www.winsomevein.com/2012/01/they-owe-to-some-obsession-they-deny_30.html

Chester Pane's picture
Chester Pane from Portland, Oregon is reading The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz March 30, 2012 - 3:01pm

Did someone mention lego boobs?

aliensoul77's picture
aliensoul77 from a cold distant star is reading the writing on the wall. March 30, 2012 - 3:44pm

I like confessional poetry as long as it's genuine.

Sexton and Plath's stuff was meaningful because they lived what they wrote. They were madwomen. They smothered themselves in their own madness but there is also a consequence of that. Hence, the suicide.

aliensoul77's picture
aliensoul77 from a cold distant star is reading the writing on the wall. March 30, 2012 - 3:46pm

By the way ladies, if you like writing dark confessional poetry, I am starting a new pdf mag called the Surreal Grotesque and I am looking for poetry submissions.  I love bipolar poetry.

Big Plath/Sexton fan here.  So if you think this is your niche.  Email me at dangrn77@hotmail.com.