Dwayne's picture
Dwayne from Cincinnati, Ohio (suburbs) is reading books that rotate to often to keep this updated February 14, 2013 - 9:19pm

How many projects do you keep going at one time that you are really doing work on? Not stuff you've put away and say you are working on, or intend to get back to, but do some kind of work on? How long does it take you guys to get 'done' with various types of works? Just wondering.

Carly Berg's picture
Carly Berg from USA is reading Story Prompts That Work by Carly Berg is now available at Amazon February 14, 2013 - 11:56pm

Besides the stuff on the back burner that I pretend I'm going to get back to any day now, I really just work on one project. I write two or three flash stories a week, one at a time, and they take maybe 8 to 20 hours each, including reading through them with husband and re-writes. Now and then I don't write any for a month or so. Sometimes my mind is just concrete and I feel like I have used up my imagination and  ideas for a while. Other than that, I am prolific and extremely slow at the same time. I probably write like three words per hour, lol. I'm somewhere over halfway done, as far as having enough that are published and that I think are good enough to go into a book of flash stories. Maybe at about two years total, about 8 more months, that project will be done. I guess I've always just worked on one writing project at a time, come to think of it.

OtisTheBulldog's picture
OtisTheBulldog from Somerville, MA is reading The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz February 15, 2013 - 9:29am

I keep a bunch going at once. I'm working on a novel. I continually write short stories (especially because of WAR). I'm in the early stages of a serial fiction project that I'm co-writing with a friend. I also will write shitty poetry, ballads, lyrics and three paragraph stories when I just want to write without working on any of the above.

I could probably use more focus, especially on the novel, but I like the variety and working with different voices and experimenting using the shorts - in the long run that's going to (hopefully) translate to strengthening my longer works. 

I do continually shuffle and rotate around my works, sometimes at the detriment of others, but they're all getting their time.

What I really need to do is put some focus on revising and submitting.

Linda's picture
Linda from Sweden is reading Fearful Symmetries February 15, 2013 - 10:10am

I usually work on one short project, but keep a 'flash tab' open in Scrivener while I write in case I need to get something out. Then when I've finished (or abandoned) the story I've been working on, I can have a look under my flash tap and see if there's something there to get a new story going, or worth editing. In general, I need deadlines in order to finish anything, but with that in mind, a short can take anywhere from 8 to 40 hours (estimate). 

 

I also have a novel that I've been working on for 10 years. It's a slow process, and an ambitious project, but I hope I will accumulate enough skill to finish it some day.

Richard's picture
Richard from St. Louis is reading various anthologies February 15, 2013 - 8:14pm

oh man, where to begin?

i'm editing two anthologies right now.

i WAS writing a story a week in WAR2. those are all being shopped or are placed.

just got done rewriting my first novel, Transubstantiate, as a YA title, called Seven Deadly.

i write two columns a month here at Lit Reactor for Storyville.

I write book reviews, been slacking on that. maybe 12 a year, as much as 24 a year.

i write infrequently for ManArchy, a column called The Word, and other essays and fiction.

but if you sidled up to me in a bar and asked me what i'm writing, i'd probably say nothing, since technically we are shopping my 2nd book, Disintegration, and I'm totally blocked on my third novel, Incarnate, about 8,000 words into it.

i like to write shorter stuff, even when i'm doing a novel. but if a novel has taken hold, i can go under for days, a week or more and just disappear. wrote 40,000 words of Disintegration in one week.

deadlines, themed anthologies, competitions, they keep me on my toes.

YOU?

Dwayne's picture
Dwayne from Cincinnati, Ohio (suburbs) is reading books that rotate to often to keep this updated February 16, 2013 - 8:30am

I have a few dozen projects in the out line phase I work on once a month, although that might be less then 10 minutes per project. I have two novels I'm writing on the reg, one memoir I'm revising most weeks, two short stories I'm revising, and one new novel that seems to insist I take some time to write it. I l also have a ton of other projects that get a small bit of time here and there.

Chacron's picture
Chacron from England, South Coast is reading Fool's Assassin by Robin Hobb February 16, 2013 - 2:00pm

I've no set answer to this. I used to do one at a time but it varies, here's what I've currently got:

One novel, We Are The Business, science fiction, completed first draft back in march, totalled 300,000 words, currently working on draft two but taking a break as since I joined this I've got into writing shorter stuff, namely...

Two shorter stories, the first being It's not what it looks like, which I submitted to the Teleport Us competition but I'm going back for further drafts based on the feedback I've got so far. The second I only started this week and I can't get anything I'm happy with out of the idea, but it's only a week old so I'm persevering. Working title is Local Hero but it's not going to keep that title, I want something better and I'm sure there's something already called that, I just haven't googled it yet.

I have one story I shelved that was a first novel attempt started back in 2009, Everything Disappears, that got to 70,000 words before I dried up with it but I dug it out recently and started to get ideas again, it could go somewhere but my priority is still my more recent stuff.

fun's picture
fun from Washington is reading The Curiosities February 17, 2013 - 3:18am

I try not to keep more than six active projects at once, because I'm a disgustingly lazy underachiever. On average, I'll have three different projects I work on during the week, with three others I spend my nights and mornings revising/restarting/throwing fits over. I also try to only have one or two of those projects be something novel/novella length; my short stories are easier to hammer out and my novellas are the ones I spend most of my time revising.

Rachel Saunders's picture
Rachel Saunders from York, UK is reading Lots of factual stuff for ideas February 17, 2013 - 4:46am

In terms of writing I have an ongoing story which I am trying to write 7000 words a week for, along with various vignettes set in the same universe to add flavour.

alexgamen's picture
alexgamen from Argentina is reading 1Q84; The Way of Kings February 17, 2013 - 6:38am

Mm... I tend to work on just one thing at a time, and that's how I churned out six novels in a row. But now I've gone back to an earlier project, a fantasy/sci-fi book that's a mammoth at an estimated 300,000 words, so I'm going back to it every six-months or so to make sure I keep it alive. That's going to be done in about 2 more years, I guess, but I'm not in a rush.

Meanwhile, I just started a new novel with just a very broad outline in my head, as opposed to all the planning I did for my previous ones. It's a palate cleanser in terms of trusting my skills and not worrying just now about chapter length or stuff like that.

And I have 2 more novels that I've written about 8000 words which I've been saving for a 'rainy day' or the equivalent (when inspiration strikes me again and makes me anxious to finish them, mostly).

What I've found that works for me is to keep a folder on my computer for my future novels, and then make subfolders for each project with the (admittedly broad) idea that sparked it. I have like ten of those, some are more detailed, some are nothing more than a title that I liked and are waiting for a relevant idea.

That way, if I get bored with what I'm writing, I can always go ahead and try to start a new novel, or at least flesh it out to get my creative juices going.

 

 

Flybywrite's picture
Flybywrite from Rocky Point, Long Island is reading The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky, by Stephen Crane February 27, 2013 - 11:50am

It's an interesting question, and one I began to shall we say grapple with in earnest only recently.  I joined this site near the end of a nearly six year stretch of starting many things and working on them devotedly, but, (unless disconnected nebulas hundreds of pages long can be counted along the way to getting somewhere, besides a few floors below hell) finishing nothing.

On my way in here, in retrospect I found that I had launched into advertising campaign about being, at the worst of times, a flagrant overwriter with my own semi-grammatical rules.  And then it became evident that I had set out to prove the relaibility of my advertisements. "Hi, my name's Flybywrite, and nobody overwrites in his own special way, and also for prolonged periods of time to no evident purpose, like I do and it's beginning to fucking hurt..." I may have been struggling to say. 

Eventually, with the help of a kind of a sudden consensus of opinion on my marvelous writing style that shifted the subject of a thread for a while, and with the private help of a couple of talented and ridiculously perceptive members, I was propelled into an epiphany.  I have to finish things.  I don't know if theres a particular fiction writing based pathology that runs the range from neurosis to psychosis, but I'm guessing yes.    

But I am kind of grateful for that liitle stretch of acid-rain critique that came down in my early thread life here in the Lit Reactor, it made me become to hold on to the sort of usage I can use pretty well in spots and make something move at once, and most of all to fucking finish for a great change.  And I have, and I just made a final vow to stop obsessing over it, and it's something with a thematic basis in excommunication though hopefully no one will care called Gorilla in the Midst.  So yeah, anyway, my point: its that I think at some point expecially if only starting is going on for too long, most fiction writers likely need to undergo a serious self-examination and see if they've caught a case of fear of finishing.  

Flybywrite's picture
Flybywrite from Rocky Point, Long Island is reading The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky, by Stephen Crane February 28, 2013 - 11:15am

Flybywrite, you are a fascinating man.  You should be on TV, or at least start a project.

Brandon's picture
Brandon from KCMO is reading Made to Break February 28, 2013 - 11:18am

Flybywrite, you are a fascinating man.  You should be on TV, or at least start a project.

Did you log into the wrong account again?

avery of the dead's picture
avery of the dead from Kentucky is reading Cipher Sisters February 28, 2013 - 12:09pm

Well, you know, that one was pretty funny.

Dwayne's picture
Dwayne from Cincinnati, Ohio (suburbs) is reading books that rotate to often to keep this updated February 28, 2013 - 2:16pm

Odd.

JEFFREY GRANT BARR's picture
JEFFREY GRANT BARR from Central OR is reading Nothing but fucking Shakespeare, for the rest of my life February 28, 2013 - 2:19pm

I've just assumed that Flybywrite has been fport this whole time. Didn't everyone? No one can go on and on... and on like those two.

Dwayne's picture
Dwayne from Cincinnati, Ohio (suburbs) is reading books that rotate to often to keep this updated February 28, 2013 - 2:38pm

Yeah, that too. Still odd.

JEFFREY GRANT BARR's picture
JEFFREY GRANT BARR from Central OR is reading Nothing but fucking Shakespeare, for the rest of my life February 28, 2013 - 2:53pm

Just like my puppet account is Dwayne. Or am I Dwayne's evil, sexually adventurous altar-ego?

 

 

Dwayne's picture
Dwayne from Cincinnati, Ohio (suburbs) is reading books that rotate to often to keep this updated February 28, 2013 - 6:17pm

I hope I don't hurt your feelings, but you are not even in the top 5 people who want me to be my alternative identity.

OtisTheBulldog's picture
OtisTheBulldog from Somerville, MA is reading The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz March 2, 2013 - 8:50am

It's the hangover that makes it hard for me to wrap my head around all of this. But I'd like to add that I am a fascinating man as well. No, seriously, I am. I'm going to tell women about it later on today. 

As far as on-going projects. I've taken to start drawing shitty cartoons after a 28 year break. I plan on keeping that in the repertoire. I'm going to show women my drawings later on today.

Stacy_R_Haynes's picture
Stacy_R_Haynes from North Charleston, SC is reading Coffee Break Screenwriter March 2, 2013 - 10:32am

I usually have two or three fiction projects I work on at the same time. While working on those, I do little side short stories where I write and I have no clue where those are going. Those take much longer to get together, as I pick them up the moment an idea/scene strikes me.     

Brainstorming has been what I've been doing for a couple of ideas of late, to see where the story's direction lies. I don't know if I'll like all the ideas for the concepts, but I like the idea of writing ideas out without a censor.  

On Sundays I end up writing essays on films longhand, or at least part of them (this reminds me to work on them more). 

Of late I read a lot more, which I think improves my frequency of writing.  

NikKorpon's picture
NikKorpon from Baltimore is reading Book and books and books and March 2, 2013 - 1:16pm

I try to keep at least a few things going, even if it's only stories.

At the moment I'm outlining a boxing novella to pitch and just outlined a novel that I'll start in a couple weeks after finishing edits on another novella.

Trying to write some nonfiction stuff, either articles or essays or a column I'm going to start/restart at ManArchy.

A lot of my time has been taken up by lecture notes for classes, actually, which I hadn't expected. Then some more critical theory stuff for a film noir class I'm taking.

I've got a couple stories for Solarcide and PWG I've been meaning to write but haven't gotten to yet.

It's weird because I've had DARK PLACES sitting on my desk that I've been dying to get into but have been too busy writing, which is good though I'm really dying just to sit and watch The Young Ones or something.

Arwen Undomiel's picture
Arwen Undomiel from Sydney, Australia March 7, 2013 - 12:20am

I have at least two projects- one I'm stuck on and another which I'm now working on. I'm combining Tolkien and mythology in both.

John Loeffler's picture
John Loeffler from Brooklyn, NY is reading Gallatian Canyon by Tom McGuane March 7, 2013 - 11:55am

I generally try to finish one project before moving onto the next. Novel edits are a seperate issue though, since that's taking a ton of time. I've been working on short stuff as asides to theat project, just to keep me feeling like I'm producing SOMETHING.

fport's picture
fport from Canada is reading The World Until Yesterday - Jared Diamond March 9, 2013 - 9:13pm

I've just assumed that Flybywrite has been fport this whole time. Didn't everyone? No one can go on and on... and on like those two.

yo, Jeffrey, little words, short sentences and shut up so we can spend way more time worshipping at the altar of your brilliance?

I have a few projects that are not related and involve different disciplines all headed in the same general direction. On hold is the story about the biogeneticist (lives at home in the basement and can afford second hand equipment and is weirdly genius) who has a penchant with the tripod aliens introduced in Star Trek Voyager that come from another dimension and decides that he is going to solve the next step for mankind to be a spaceworthy creature, tough skin, alternative energy, expanded senses and of course tripodism. A cautionary tale that ends up getting out of hand, reducing the world population and leaving a bunch of three legged egg shaped beings with a terrific eye and all mankind's knoweldge mapped into their DNA that are uber tough, long living, hibernatory as needed and have no assholes, but that's a long story.

Another is an AI story which I label a sentient entity because it is not a product of human intervention, it arises from the electronic environment the humans have created. This one I want to do as a web comic and have been at it for a couple of years. Mastering the tools and gathering the pieces are a major factor with this project.

Then the writing, two things stand out, one is a life experience debriefing for those that follow down the paths trodden by those who have come before. The anecdotal history of 30 years of an organization. There are eight boxes of documentation to back this one up from legislative hansard minutes to actual arbitration and lawsuit rulings. A tale of intrigue, power politics and personal involvement in pivotal events.

The other is a tale of a hacker or two starting in the eighties leading out to the far future. 

litreactor is the first serious step where I have come to declare that this is what I want to do. I have collected the tools, the situations, the books, read hundreds and hundreds of novels and now I'm declaring my path foward in public. We'll see what happens. 

 

Tony Koval's picture
Tony Koval from Jesustown, Bible Belt, Texas, USA is reading more and more and more March 10, 2013 - 11:16am

One thousand ongoing projects. Zero finished ones.

Nick Wilczynski's picture
Nick Wilczynski from Greensboro, NC is reading A Dance with Dragons by George R.R. Martin March 10, 2013 - 11:23pm

I used to think that I could work on two at a time, but work has been killing me.

I was angling for my manager's job, and doing a rather good job of it, she was leaving in a couple of months and I have been doing most of the various managerial duties for months, rubbing the office director's face in how competently I was handling it, how I had checked off virtually all of the boxes that needed to be checked off and she needed to give me my goddamn promotion so I could more effectively manage my goddamn office.

And then my manager and a solid half of the office was fired, so now instead of doing most of the managerial duties I've been doing them all. And the way that they were fired (for behavior that was so egrigiously unacceptable I dare not speak of it, not directly related to me doing her work, but not unrelated) means that our Director is out of town for a couple of weeks (I presume she is being raked over coals by her superiors for what happened, and for her various incompetencies) and so I've been doing all the management/logistical support for an office of door to door canvassers (show up early, distribute streets to be canvassed, talk to dispatch about what we're going to be doing, run briefings and training sessions, provide any support for anyone while canvassing, do every scrap of paperwork for everyone, lock up the office after everyone else left half an hour ago, raise money, get people to write their Senators about NC's new insane tax reform proposal) and I'm still only getting paid as a "Trainer" (non-management position, about half the pay of a manager and a quarter of a director, non-salaried (but i DID get to hold on to my Union Card and position of Shop Steward to up the insanity quotient i.e. if they got mad at the way I'm doing things and decided to strike they would ask me to organize the strike)).

At this point I suspect that the entire thing is going to collapse around my ears and that they are just going to close the NC office and lay the rest of us off.

Also, lost my license and was put on probation three months ago (of course I was innocent, but I won't bore you with excuses), so times has been tough.

-

But anyways, I get home from that, or I wake up on Saturday afternoon, and I try to write anything, but as Christ said "No man can serve two masters," and so at this point my single writing project is "freewrite, try to keep in shape" and the thought of doing anything serious just about makes me cry.

Strange Photon's picture
Strange Photon from Fort Wayne, IN is reading Laurie Anderson lyrics March 12, 2013 - 11:30am

I would like to attach my name to Tony's comment. Though, to be entirely honest with myself, and the world at large, I should amend his comment for personal use in the following way:

One thousand gestating ideas, zero live births in quite some time.

Anyone know a good midwife?

Tim Johnson's picture
Tim Johnson from Rockville, MD is reading Notes From a Necrophobe by T.C. Armstrong March 12, 2013 - 11:46am

One at a time, and I'm very slow. I have a queue of story ideas that only seems to be getting longer, but if I don't focus on my favorite ideas, my writing is crap.

By very slow, I mean it isn't unusual for me to only produce about one story per month. Granted, my time to write is very limited, and my stories tend to be longer than average and my writing denser than average (hey, that's what I like!).

I'm also a big advocate of multiple rewrites and heavy editing. Most of my actual writing comes in the rewrite and editing stages. Very little of what I write in an initial draft makes it into the final. I'm obsessive about reading my own work and trying different things, different sentence structures, different words.

My novel, Carrier, is about 130k words. If I counted the drafts and the cuts, I bet I actually wrote close to a million words for it. It took me a little over two years to push it away, and in that time, it was my sole focus.

I really hope I get faster. :-/

JEFFREY GRANT BARR's picture
JEFFREY GRANT BARR from Central OR is reading Nothing but fucking Shakespeare, for the rest of my life March 12, 2013 - 11:03pm

Regarding faster writing, I read a book called '2k to 10k: Writing Faster, Writing Better, and Writing More of What You Love' by Rachel Aaron that had some interesting and effective methods to increase wordcount. I don't think it will appeal much to the hippie-dippie 'I'm an artist maaaan' types round here, but for some it may be rather useful. I use the methods, and while I'm not writing 10k words a day, I have increased my output quite dramatically. 

OtisTheBulldog's picture
OtisTheBulldog from Somerville, MA is reading The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz March 13, 2013 - 7:57am

JGB - sounds like you'd advocate at least checking the book out. Care to share a few quick ideas or what you liked the best? What's working best for you?

Regarding writing more - I go by the creed "Allow yourself to suck" which is the standard "get it on the page" thing. Revision comes later. 

I tried the NaNo thing this year. I had mixed results. I quit about half way because of WAR, another project, and I started hating the word quota and I knew I was just putting shit down to put shit down. But months later, I'm back on that project. I had 125 pages of material. Now I'm going through some serious, serious editing, revision, re-imagining - completely deleting characters, merging others, etc. 

So in that respect, that sucky writing I was doing in November is paying dividends now since it helped shape a world in my mind and give me a lot of material to work with and start to chisel away and reshape. 

Strange Photon's picture
Strange Photon from Fort Wayne, IN is reading Laurie Anderson lyrics March 13, 2013 - 8:06am

I have some major issues with NaNo, at least the values that those in charge seem to run the thing by, but I LOVE your line about allowing yourself to suck!

That is gold, man.

JEFFREY GRANT BARR's picture
JEFFREY GRANT BARR from Central OR is reading Nothing but fucking Shakespeare, for the rest of my life March 13, 2013 - 9:25am

Otis:

What really worked for me that the book suggested is basically front-loading the work of writing the novel into the planning stages - here are some of the stand-out parts of the system for me:

1. Time line - write out a basic timeline of what happens in and around the story, in stric chronological order. This includes 'Who knows what and when', which is an earlier step in the outlining process.

2. Scene list - this one especially. Basically, you sketch out individual scenes (YMMV, it works well for me, but I write pretty standard 'scenes', no fancy tricks etc, then group them into chapters.

3. Metrics: keeping track of trends to see when and what works for you.

This is in no way indicative of the quality of the book, I do recommend checking out the book - like all good systems, you can take what you choose and leave the rest as it suits you.

 

 

 

 

fport's picture
fport from Canada is reading The World Until Yesterday - Jared Diamond March 13, 2013 - 9:51am

Jeffrey, I'll see your 2-10K, which I also read and raise you a cute little site for the mechanical aspects which cannot be taken for granted, touch typing. I'd also like to see a snippet of Tim's writing in the workshop once I get my ability to pay, back.

JEFFREY GRANT BARR's picture
JEFFREY GRANT BARR from Central OR is reading Nothing but fucking Shakespeare, for the rest of my life March 13, 2013 - 10:56am

I'm a die-hard vim user, so my typing is pretty good at this point.

#protip:

re-map your esc key to :jk - you'll rarely have to leave the home row.

Poll: who here took typing on an actual typewriter in school? I loved those big metal Olivettis - even though I would never use on these days, there's nothing quite like the feel/weight of those keys.

Utah's picture
Moderator
Utah from Fort Worth, TX is reading Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry March 13, 2013 - 11:34am

I learned on an electric.  Don't know if that counts.

re-map your esc key to :jk - you'll rarely have to leave the home row.

What does all that mean?  What will that do for me?  I use Word all the time; why don't I know this?

JEFFREY GRANT BARR's picture
JEFFREY GRANT BARR from Central OR is reading Nothing but fucking Shakespeare, for the rest of my life March 13, 2013 - 11:51am

Utah:

Just stuff this in your ~/.vimrc and watch the magic happen:

inoremap <esc> <nop>
inoremap jk <esc>

Voila!

Actually, I only brought it up in hopes of inciting a vi <> emacs flame-war. Wouldn't be a forum without one of those.

 

 

JEFFREY GRANT BARR's picture
JEFFREY GRANT BARR from Central OR is reading Nothing but fucking Shakespeare, for the rest of my life March 13, 2013 - 11:55am

And since you asked:

I learned on an electric.  Don't know if that counts.

It does not.

 

 

Utah's picture
Moderator
Utah from Fort Worth, TX is reading Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry March 13, 2013 - 12:08pm

~/.vimrc

What is that?

OtisTheBulldog's picture
OtisTheBulldog from Somerville, MA is reading The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz March 13, 2013 - 1:35pm

JGB - cool, thanks for sharing. I'll check it out of the library. For my novel, I did/am using a timeline. Of course, nothing is set in stone, but just having that visual helps me a lot. I like loosely outlining. Or the way I see it is:

I'm driving from Boston to Portland. Here's the map. Here's the route I can take. But I'm cool with taking roads I've never thought of. And fuck it if I never get to Portland if Boise suits my needs.

I was born in 77. Learned to type in school on early apples, I believe. There was cutesly little games that tought me the skills.

Rachele Noir's picture
Rachele Noir from Minneapolis March 13, 2013 - 6:22pm

I am working on a novel and have started a short story complication. My mind works like mental gymnastics! 

Brandon's picture
Brandon from KCMO is reading Made to Break March 13, 2013 - 6:53pm

Complication? Damn autocorrect. 

fport's picture
fport from Canada is reading The World Until Yesterday - Jared Diamond March 13, 2013 - 6:59pm

Rachele, let me get this straight because people like Dwayne have caused endless hours of threads and complete 180 degree huh's with not only word choice but spelling. 

Let me run this forward slowly to my sticking point....

I am working on a novel...

This part seems straight forward but the second part...

...and have started a short story complication.

I'd like to assume you meant what you said, but there is the possibility that you meant a compilation. However, at this point your ending statement...

My mind works like mental gymnastics!

This could be read either way. You see my dilemma here? You were steadily embarked on a writing task where suddenly independent ideas not directly involved in your plot started jumping out of the woodwork, and since they were so cute you couldn't just leave them orphaned while you stayed the course so you gathered them up into a short story, OR you are proceeding with not only a novel, but you have a completely separate compilation of short stories on the go as well and that you are mentally adroit in the handling of both pieces at the same time.

Dwayne's picture
Dwayne from Cincinnati, Ohio (suburbs) is reading books that rotate to often to keep this updated March 14, 2013 - 12:46am

@Tim - At 130,000 words and not done aren't you creeping up on a short trilogy instead of one long book?

@Jeff - How many words per day are you up too?

@Strange - What is wrong with the values? Aren't they going for the lowest word count that can be a book in a month?

@Rachel Noir - Don't worry about the spelling, happens to the best of us. Are you working on a one story at a time, or several stories for the compilation?

@fport - Neither the time, nor the place. Best of luck.

JEFFREY GRANT BARR's picture
JEFFREY GRANT BARR from Central OR is reading Nothing but fucking Shakespeare, for the rest of my life March 15, 2013 - 11:24am

Dwayne: I think I now land somehwere between 500-1500 words per day. That is not fast at all, I know, but previous to that I was lucky to do about 200-300 a day. Some days it was just a sentence that I rewrote 5 times.

Brandon's picture
Brandon from KCMO is reading Made to Break March 15, 2013 - 11:46am

Dwayne: I think I now land somehwere between 500-1500 words per day. That is not fast at all, I know, but previous to that I was lucky to do about 200-300 a day. Some days it was just a sentence that I rewrote 5 times.

That's pretty fast. That means you could be at novel-length in as little as a couple months.

JEFFREY GRANT BARR's picture
JEFFREY GRANT BARR from Central OR is reading Nothing but fucking Shakespeare, for the rest of my life March 15, 2013 - 2:09pm

Brandon: That's what I'm hoping. I write short novels, so I want to have my current WIP done 3 months from now and polished within 6. I also need to stop dicking around with multiple projects and just finish the current one. The siren song of short stories is always trying to lure me into her clutches.

Dwayne's picture
Dwayne from Cincinnati, Ohio (suburbs) is reading books that rotate to often to keep this updated March 15, 2013 - 4:40pm

@Jeff - I'm more looking for a steady word count. I have days that I struggle to get more then 30 or 40 words, and days I get four chapters.

TomMartinArt's picture
TomMartinArt from Amherst, MA March 15, 2013 - 5:44pm

Lemme do a count... okay, a quick count brings me to 13. I'm sure there's more, but that's off the top of my head. 

Tim Johnson's picture
Tim Johnson from Rockville, MD is reading Notes From a Necrophobe by T.C. Armstrong March 18, 2013 - 7:30am

@Dwayne, I've been done with it for about six months. Trying to sell it now.

Dwayne's picture
Dwayne from Cincinnati, Ohio (suburbs) is reading books that rotate to often to keep this updated March 18, 2013 - 7:12pm

Any luck?