L.W. Flouisa's picture
L.W. Flouisa from Tennessee is reading More Murakami April 28, 2014 - 7:40am

Ever write themselves into a hole? I seemed to have found myself in this novelette, where its become ambiguously SF or Fantasy. It could be argued as science fantasy, as while although there is magic it's more like ancient ruined technology.

I guess I'll see where I'll go with it.

I tend to gravitate to Science fantasy. I'm not sure what I like about corroding anti-gravity with time bombs on it. But whatever.

L.W. Flouisa's picture
L.W. Flouisa from Tennessee is reading More Murakami April 28, 2014 - 7:48am

Actually right now it's more: fight monsters, advance, fight monsters, advance type formulae. This always happens after around say 7,000 words. The only way I got around that in Nymphs Of Winter Fire (what's now Pocket Watch Fairies in which the scene is removed), is one giant mountain pass dogdging volcanic ash cut scene.

I'm seeing a rewrite before I'm finished.

Grigori Black's picture
Grigori Black from US is reading Radium Girls by Amanda Gowin April 28, 2014 - 8:29am

In a lot of my first prijects and stories I'd write myself into a corner and wind up with 'now what'? Lately though, I've been letting my writing meander a little and it winds up tying up loose ends. I've hit three or four roadblocks over the course of my current project. Going back, I found little bits of information here and there that tied it up neatly.

L.W. Flouisa's picture
L.W. Flouisa from Tennessee is reading More Murakami April 28, 2014 - 8:39am

I might end up reading over it again.

Its not really a hole, so much as that after a point it start feeling like playing a generic JRPG instead of advancing something meaningful from the plot.

In gaming we used to call it grinding, good times.

jyh's picture
jyh from VA is reading whatever he feels like April 28, 2014 - 9:38am

Not so many holes, more points of infinite possibility. It's a weird feeling: you suddenly realize you're writing a story. When prior to that point you were just writing, zen-like, in the zone, the suspicion that you need to reign it in comes upon you, and you start to wonder where it's going, though the onset neither required nor demanded any sense or suggestion of a destination. That's how it is for me, anyway. I never feel like I can't continue writing, only wonder why I would. The downside of self-awareness.

Nathan Scalia's picture
Nathan Scalia from Kansas is reading so many things April 28, 2014 - 10:12am

The first time I tried writing a book, I found myself in a hole 25K words in. I really wanted to write the scene, but had no idea how to get my character out of it. So I invented a new character to help.

I abandoned the book after 40K words, because it was bad and the main character was too quirky to be a main character. But the new character I had created to avoid the plot snag was interesting, and when I started writing my current book, I started writing about him instead, and my former main character is now a side character. It's been a fun process.

L.W. Flouisa's picture
L.W. Flouisa from Tennessee is reading More Murakami April 28, 2014 - 11:21am

I think my previous one I was in one at 20K. The biggest reason was I was using two different maps I drew that the main characters would travel too.

I'm not sure whats a plot snag, or just "how is a long period where nothing much happens on the train, oh except shard fragment! Lets fight fairies."

Ok did it, all it took was a good train tipping. Lol.

Bob Pastorella's picture
Bob Pastorella from Groves, Texas is reading murder books trying to stay hip, I'm thinking of you, and you're out there so Say your prayers, Say your prayers, Say your prayers April 29, 2014 - 3:29pm

The problem with Act 3 is Act 1.

Same could be said for Act 2. 

The answer to most of those times when you feel like you've written yourself into a corner is at the beginning of the story, whereas you failed to foreshadow something. In the first part of my WIP, I made sure to overwrite the hell out of it, hoping to cut a lot more than I need to add. It's not a perfect process, as I know I've forgotten something that I'll hopefully be able to foreshadow later. All is not lost, you're just trying to find the story. 

When all else fails, drop a dead body in there somewhere. Works really well if it's a main character. That'll get the ball rolling again. You can always perform mind-to-edit resuscitation with that dead character later on, it's just a trick for first drafts to get things going in the right direction. You'll usually figure it all out later, plus you still have to rewrite the whole damn thing anyway. 

Flad the Imposter's picture
Flad the Imposter April 29, 2014 - 10:13pm

Oh, yes. Certainly. I was scribbling in my thought spot but not very thoughtfully as I wasn't watching where I was walking and-- wwwhuupp! Gaglashed right down into an open manhole and didn't know what to do next!

L.W. Flouisa's picture
L.W. Flouisa from Tennessee is reading More Murakami April 30, 2014 - 11:30am

Luckily I got out of it, though I'm finding things happening sooner. I guess my leads are ... leading the story.:P

Dwayne's picture
Dwayne from Cincinnati, Ohio (suburbs) is reading books that rotate to often to keep this updated May 1, 2014 - 6:57am

I've found that you can write yourself out of any hole by doing something horrible to the characters.

Flad the Imposter's picture
Flad the Imposter May 1, 2014 - 7:33pm

Like burying them in a hole.

Dwayne's picture
Dwayne from Cincinnati, Ohio (suburbs) is reading books that rotate to often to keep this updated May 1, 2014 - 7:56pm

That can work.