T. Dagarim's picture
T. Dagarim from Atlanta, GA December 10, 2015 - 8:04am

I'm curious if anyone has ever written or read any dangerous writing pieces set in space. Given the scene setting, it seems that minimalistic writing would be difficult. I'm workign on a few concepts that I'd like to flesh out, and I'd love to know if there are any good works to reference. Every scifi I've read seems to expound with detailed descriptions, and maybe that just the "nature of the beast".

The closest I can seem to find is Ursula K. Le Guin, and I did love The Lathe of Heaven. However, that really wouldn't be classified as minimalism.

Anybody have any good references?

Redd Tramp's picture
Redd Tramp from Los Angeles, CA is reading Mongrels by SGJ; Sacred and Immoral: On the Writings of Chuck Palahniuk; The History of Sexuality by Michel Foucault December 10, 2015 - 10:42am

Maybe check out the short story The Oarsmen, from the collection We Live Inside You, by Jeremy Robert Johnson. Not exactly minimalist—though his prose is excellent, tight—but it's definitely Dangerous. Though the focus isn't exactly on outer space; it's more on the Earth. The narrator and several others are part of some program where they're living/stuck up in crafts orbiting the Earth, watching world events play out below on televisions. Hilarious, twisted, bizarre. Good shit.

Dwayne's picture
Dwayne from Cincinnati, Ohio (suburbs) is reading books that rotate to often to keep this updated December 12, 2015 - 9:59pm

It sounds like a great idea.

Redd Tramp's picture
Redd Tramp from Los Angeles, CA is reading Mongrels by SGJ; Sacred and Immoral: On the Writings of Chuck Palahniuk; The History of Sexuality by Michel Foucault December 13, 2015 - 1:47pm

Also try out "How Billy Hanson Destroyed the Planet Earth, And Everyone On It," by Stephen Graham Jones. It's from his Zombie Sharks with Metal Teeth collection. The story's only several pages long, and its some of the best sci-fi I've read. From the same collection is his "Sea of Intranquility", about soul-storing crabs and shrimp that reside in the filled-up craters of the moon, and a hard-boiled detective seeking to track down a particular soul. SGJ's descriptions are always succinct, grounded in action. I doubt he'd call himself minimalist, his prose is a little too forked perhaps, but goddamn is he a Dangerous Writer if I've ever seen one. No, I doubt he sticks to the tenets laid down by Spanbauer, but he always comes from a bizarre, painful place, and employs something quite like Burnt Tongue—like I said, his prose is forked, weird.

Thuggish's picture
Thuggish from Vegas is reading Day of the Jackal December 17, 2015 - 10:22pm
T. Dagarim's picture
T. Dagarim from Atlanta, GA December 22, 2015 - 6:59am

Thanks for the suggestions. I've been checking out Stephen Graham Jones, and I'm loving his work so far.